Socio-demographic factors, health risks and harms associated with early initiation of injection among people who inject drugs in Tallinn, Estonia: Evidence from cross-sectional surveys

Sigrid Vorobjov, Don Des Jarlais, Katri Abel-Ollo, Ave Talu, Kristi Rüütel, Anneli Uusküla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To explore socio-demographic factors, health risks and harms associated with early initiation of injecting (before age 16) among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. Methods: IDUs were recruited using respondent driven sampling methods for two cross-sectional interviewer-administered surveys (in 2007 and 2009). Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with early initiation versus later initiation. Results: A total of 672 current IDUs reported the age when they started to inject drugs; the mean was 18 years, and about a quarter of the sample (. n=. 156) reported early initiation into injecting drugs. Factors significantly associated in multivariate analysis with early initiation were being female, having a lower educational level, being unemployed, shorter time between first drug use and injecting, high-risk injecting (sharing syringes and paraphernalia, injecting more than once a day), involvement in syringe exchange attendance and getting syringes from outreach workers, and two-fold higher risk of HIV seropositivity. Conclusions: Our results document significant adverse health consequences (including higher risk behaviour and HIV seropositivity) associated with early initiation into drug injecting and emphasize the need for comprehensive prevention programs and early intervention efforts targeting youth at risk. Our findings suggest that interventions designed to delay the age of starting drug use, including injecting drug use, can contribute to reducing risk behaviour and HIV prevalence among IDUs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

Fingerprint

Estonia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Drug Users
Injections
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations
HIV Seropositivity
Syringes
Risk-Taking
Needle Sharing
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
HIV
Interviews

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Eastern Europe
  • HIV
  • Injecting drug use
  • Respondent driven sampling
  • Risk behaviour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Socio-demographic factors, health risks and harms associated with early initiation of injection among people who inject drugs in Tallinn, Estonia : Evidence from cross-sectional surveys. / Vorobjov, Sigrid; Des Jarlais, Don; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi; Uusküla, Anneli.

In: International Journal of Drug Policy, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.03.2013, p. 150-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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