Social Esteem and Participation in Contentious Politics: A Field Experiment at an LGBT Pride Rally

Gwyneth Hartman-Mcclendon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    What motivates individuals to participate in contentious, political forms of collective action? In this article, I consider the possibility that the promise of social esteem from an ingroup can act as a powerful selective incentive for individuals to participate in contentious politics. I conducted a field experiment-the first to my knowledge to take place in the context of a political march, rally, or social-identity event-to isolate this esteem mechanism from others. Using measures of intent to attend, actual attendance, and reported attendance at a gay and lesbian pride event in New Jersey, I find evidence that the promise of social esteem boosts all three measures of participation. The article offers new theoretical and practical implications for the study of participation in nonvoting forms of collective action.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)279-290
    Number of pages12
    JournalAmerican Journal of Political Science
    Volume58
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    collective behavior
    participation
    politics
    event
    experiment
    incentive
    evidence

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Political Science and International Relations

    Cite this

    Social Esteem and Participation in Contentious Politics : A Field Experiment at an LGBT Pride Rally. / Hartman-Mcclendon, Gwyneth.

    In: American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 58, No. 2, 2014, p. 279-290.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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