Social and political factors predicting the presence of syringe exchange programs in 96 us metropolitan areas

Barbara Tempalski, Peter L. Flom, Samuel R. Friedman, Don Des Jarlais, Judith J. Friedman, Courtney Mcknight, Risa Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Community activism can be important in shaping public health policies. For example, political pressure and direct action from grassroots activists have been central to the formation of syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in the United States. We explored why SEPs are present in some localities but not others, hypothesizing that programs are unevenly distributed across geographic areas as a result of political, socioeconomic, and organizational characteristics of localities, including needs, resources, and local opposition. We examined the effects of these factors on whether SEPs were present in different US metropolitan statistical areas in 2000. Predictors of the presence of an SEP included percentage of the population with a college education, the existence of local AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) chapters, and the percentage of men who have sex with men in the population. Need was not a predictor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-447
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

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Needle-Exchange Programs
Politics
Public Policy
Health Policy
Population
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Public Health
Education
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Social and political factors predicting the presence of syringe exchange programs in 96 us metropolitan areas. / Tempalski, Barbara; Flom, Peter L.; Friedman, Samuel R.; Des Jarlais, Don; Friedman, Judith J.; Mcknight, Courtney; Friedman, Risa.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 97, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 437-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tempalski, Barbara ; Flom, Peter L. ; Friedman, Samuel R. ; Des Jarlais, Don ; Friedman, Judith J. ; Mcknight, Courtney ; Friedman, Risa. / Social and political factors predicting the presence of syringe exchange programs in 96 us metropolitan areas. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2007 ; Vol. 97, No. 3. pp. 437-447.
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