“So that his mind will open”: Parental perceptions of early childhood education in urbanizing Ghana

Sarah Kabay, Sharon Wolf, Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As policy makers and practitioners work to increase access to early childhood education (ECE) and to improve the quality of existing services, it is important that the field consider the perspective of a key stakeholder: parents. This study analyzes 33 interviews with parents of young children in urban Ghana. The interviews investigate (1) what parents believe to be the purpose of ECE, and (2) parents’ perspective on what and how young children should learn. Results are analyzed around five themes: play, homework, mobility, language and diversity, and age of entry into school. Implications for global ECE policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-53
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Educational Development
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Ghana
parents
childhood
education
education policy
stakeholder
homework
interview
young
language
school
services
policy

Keywords

  • Early childhood education
  • Ghana
  • Preschool
  • Urbanization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

“So that his mind will open” : Parental perceptions of early childhood education in urbanizing Ghana. / Kabay, Sarah; Wolf, Sharon; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu.

In: International Journal of Educational Development, Vol. 57, 01.11.2017, p. 44-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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