Smoking patterns and preferences for technology assisted smoking cessation interventions among adults with opioid and alcohol use disorders

Babak Tofighi, Joshua Lee, Scott Sherman, Daniel Schatz, Omar El-Shahawy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Smoking remains a major public health burden among persons with opioid and/or alcohol use disorder. Methods: A 49-item semi-structured survey was conducted among urban, inpatient detoxification program patients eliciting demographic and clinical characteristics, smoking profile, technology use patterns, and preferences for adopting technology-based smoking cessation interventions. Multivariate logistic regression models further evaluated the association between participant demographic and clinical characteristics and technology preferences. Results: Participants were mostly male (91%), and admitted for detoxification for alcohol (47%), heroin (31%), or both alcohol and heroin (22%). Past 30-day smoking was reported by 78% of the sample. Mobile phone ownership was common (89%); with an average past-year turnover of 3 mobile phones and 3 phone numbers. Computer ownership was low (28%) and one third reported daily internet use (34%). Telephone (41%) and text message-based interventions (40%) were the most popular platforms to facilitate smoking cessation. Conclusions: Despite concurrent AUD-OUD, most respondents had attempted to quit smoking in the last year and preferred telephone- and text message-based interventions to facilitate smoking cessation. High turnover of mobile phones, phone numbers, and limited access to computers pose barriers to dissemination of technology-based smoking cessation interventions in this vulnerable population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)660-665
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Substance Use
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2019

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Opioid Analgesics
Cell Phones
smoking
Smoking
alcohol
Alcohols
Text Messaging
Technology
Ownership
Heroin
Telephone
Logistic Models
Demography
Vulnerable Populations
turnover
Internet
telephone
Inpatients
Public Health

Keywords

  • health information technology
  • mobile health
  • smoking cessation
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Smoking patterns and preferences for technology assisted smoking cessation interventions among adults with opioid and alcohol use disorders. / Tofighi, Babak; Lee, Joshua; Sherman, Scott; Schatz, Daniel; El-Shahawy, Omar.

In: Journal of Substance Use, Vol. 24, No. 6, 02.11.2019, p. 660-665.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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