Smoking Behaviors Among Adolescents in Foster Care

A Gender-Based Analysis

Svetlana Shpiegel, Steve Sussman, Scott Sherman, Omar El Shahawy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background and objectives: Adolescents in foster care are at high risk for cigarette smoking. However, it is not clear how their smoking behaviors vary by gender. The present study examined lifetime and current smoking among males and females, and explored gender-specific risk factors for engagement in smoking behaviors. Method: Data from the Multi Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs was used to evaluate patterns of smoking among adolescents aged 12–18 years (N = 1121; 489 males, 632 females). Results: Males and females did not differ significantly in rates of lifetime and current smoking, or in the age of smoking initiation and number of cigarettes smoked on a typical day. Gender-based analyses revealed that older age and placement in group homes or residential treatment facilities were associated with heightened risk of smoking among males. In contrast, sexual minority status (i.e., nonheterosexual orientation) and increased childhood victimization were associated with heightened risk of smoking among females. A history of running away was linked to smoking in both genders. Conclusion: Gender should be considered when designing intervention programs to address cigarette smoking among foster youth, as the stressors associated with smoking may differ for males and females.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1469-1477
    Number of pages9
    JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
    Volume52
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 19 2017

    Fingerprint

    Adolescent Behavior
    smoking
    Smoking
    adolescent
    gender
    Residential Facilities
    Group Homes
    Residential Treatment
    youth program
    Crime Victims
    Tobacco Products
    victimization
    childhood

    Keywords

    • Adolescents
    • child welfare
    • cigarette smoking
    • foster care
    • gender differences

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health(social science)
    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Smoking Behaviors Among Adolescents in Foster Care : A Gender-Based Analysis. / Shpiegel, Svetlana; Sussman, Steve; Sherman, Scott; El Shahawy, Omar.

    In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 52, No. 11, 19.09.2017, p. 1469-1477.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Shpiegel, S, Sussman, S, Sherman, S & El Shahawy, O 2017, 'Smoking Behaviors Among Adolescents in Foster Care: A Gender-Based Analysis', Substance Use and Misuse, vol. 52, no. 11, pp. 1469-1477. https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2017.1285315
    Shpiegel, Svetlana ; Sussman, Steve ; Sherman, Scott ; El Shahawy, Omar. / Smoking Behaviors Among Adolescents in Foster Care : A Gender-Based Analysis. In: Substance Use and Misuse. 2017 ; Vol. 52, No. 11. pp. 1469-1477.
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