Smokers' interest in quitting and services received

Using practice information to plan quality improvement and policy for smoking cessation

Scott Sherman, Elizabeth M. Yano, Andy B. Lanto, Barbara F. Simon, Lisa V. Rubenstein

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Given the prevalence of smoking, its impact, and the benefits of cessation, helping smokers quit should be a top priority for health care organizations. To restructure health care delivery and guide future policy, the authors used baseline survey data from an 18-site Veterans Health Administration group randomized trial to assess the level of interest in quitting smoking for a practice population and determine what smoking cessation services they reported receiving. Among 1941 current smokers, 55% did not intend to quit in the next 6 months, and the remainder intended to quit in the next month (13%) to 6 months (32%). Forty-five percent reported a quit attempt in the prior year. While nearly two thirds of smokers reported being counseled about cessation within the past year, only 29% were referred to a cessation program, and 25% received a prescription for nicotine patches. Tobacco control efforts within this population should focus on increasing the rate of assisting patients with quitting.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)33-39
    Number of pages7
    JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

    Fingerprint

    Smoking Cessation
    Quality Improvement
    Smoking
    Tobacco Use Cessation Products
    Veterans Health
    Delivery of Health Care
    United States Department of Veterans Affairs
    Population
    Tobacco
    Prescriptions
    Organizations
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Keywords

    • Counseling
    • Cross-sectional analysis
    • Primary care
    • Smoking cessation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health Policy

    Cite this

    Smokers' interest in quitting and services received : Using practice information to plan quality improvement and policy for smoking cessation. / Sherman, Scott; Yano, Elizabeth M.; Lanto, Andy B.; Simon, Barbara F.; Rubenstein, Lisa V.

    In: American Journal of Medical Quality, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 33-39.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Sherman, Scott ; Yano, Elizabeth M. ; Lanto, Andy B. ; Simon, Barbara F. ; Rubenstein, Lisa V. / Smokers' interest in quitting and services received : Using practice information to plan quality improvement and policy for smoking cessation. In: American Journal of Medical Quality. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 33-39.
    @article{a9b103b11fca4698a7f4f59ca0b0e4b5,
    title = "Smokers' interest in quitting and services received: Using practice information to plan quality improvement and policy for smoking cessation",
    abstract = "Given the prevalence of smoking, its impact, and the benefits of cessation, helping smokers quit should be a top priority for health care organizations. To restructure health care delivery and guide future policy, the authors used baseline survey data from an 18-site Veterans Health Administration group randomized trial to assess the level of interest in quitting smoking for a practice population and determine what smoking cessation services they reported receiving. Among 1941 current smokers, 55{\%} did not intend to quit in the next 6 months, and the remainder intended to quit in the next month (13{\%}) to 6 months (32{\%}). Forty-five percent reported a quit attempt in the prior year. While nearly two thirds of smokers reported being counseled about cessation within the past year, only 29{\%} were referred to a cessation program, and 25{\%} received a prescription for nicotine patches. Tobacco control efforts within this population should focus on increasing the rate of assisting patients with quitting.",
    keywords = "Counseling, Cross-sectional analysis, Primary care, Smoking cessation",
    author = "Scott Sherman and Yano, {Elizabeth M.} and Lanto, {Andy B.} and Simon, {Barbara F.} and Rubenstein, {Lisa V.}",
    year = "2005",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1177/1062860604273776",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "20",
    pages = "33--39",
    journal = "American Journal of Medical Quality",
    issn = "1062-8606",
    publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Smokers' interest in quitting and services received

    T2 - Using practice information to plan quality improvement and policy for smoking cessation

    AU - Sherman, Scott

    AU - Yano, Elizabeth M.

    AU - Lanto, Andy B.

    AU - Simon, Barbara F.

    AU - Rubenstein, Lisa V.

    PY - 2005/1/1

    Y1 - 2005/1/1

    N2 - Given the prevalence of smoking, its impact, and the benefits of cessation, helping smokers quit should be a top priority for health care organizations. To restructure health care delivery and guide future policy, the authors used baseline survey data from an 18-site Veterans Health Administration group randomized trial to assess the level of interest in quitting smoking for a practice population and determine what smoking cessation services they reported receiving. Among 1941 current smokers, 55% did not intend to quit in the next 6 months, and the remainder intended to quit in the next month (13%) to 6 months (32%). Forty-five percent reported a quit attempt in the prior year. While nearly two thirds of smokers reported being counseled about cessation within the past year, only 29% were referred to a cessation program, and 25% received a prescription for nicotine patches. Tobacco control efforts within this population should focus on increasing the rate of assisting patients with quitting.

    AB - Given the prevalence of smoking, its impact, and the benefits of cessation, helping smokers quit should be a top priority for health care organizations. To restructure health care delivery and guide future policy, the authors used baseline survey data from an 18-site Veterans Health Administration group randomized trial to assess the level of interest in quitting smoking for a practice population and determine what smoking cessation services they reported receiving. Among 1941 current smokers, 55% did not intend to quit in the next 6 months, and the remainder intended to quit in the next month (13%) to 6 months (32%). Forty-five percent reported a quit attempt in the prior year. While nearly two thirds of smokers reported being counseled about cessation within the past year, only 29% were referred to a cessation program, and 25% received a prescription for nicotine patches. Tobacco control efforts within this population should focus on increasing the rate of assisting patients with quitting.

    KW - Counseling

    KW - Cross-sectional analysis

    KW - Primary care

    KW - Smoking cessation

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17544381547&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17544381547&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1177/1062860604273776

    DO - 10.1177/1062860604273776

    M3 - Article

    VL - 20

    SP - 33

    EP - 39

    JO - American Journal of Medical Quality

    JF - American Journal of Medical Quality

    SN - 1062-8606

    IS - 1

    ER -