'Shotgunning' as an illicit drug smoking practice

David C. Perlman, Mary Patricia Perkins, Denise Paone, Lee Kochems, Nadim Salomon, Patricia Friedmann, Don Des Jarlais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There has been a rise in illicit drug smoking in the United States. 'Shotgunning' drugs (or 'doing a shotgun') refers to the practice of inhaling smoke and then exhaling it into another individual's mouth, a practice with the potential for the efficient transmission of respiratory pathogens. Three hundred fifty-four drug users (239 from a syringe exchange and 115 from a drug detoxification program) were interviewed about shotgunning and screened for tuberculosis (TB). Fifty-nine (17%; 95% CI 12.9%-20.9%) reported shotgunning while smoking crack cocaine (68%), marijuana (41%), or heroin (2%). In multivariate analysis, age ≤35 years (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.05-3.9), white race (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.8), drinking alcohol to intoxication (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.3), having engaged in high-risk sex (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.04- 6.7), and crack use (OR 6.0, 95% CI 3.0-12) were independently associated with shotgunning. Shotgunning is a frequent drug smoking practice with the potential to transmit respiratory pathogens, underscoring the need for education of drug users about the risks o f specific drug use practices, and the ongoing need for TB control among active drug users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-9
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Street Drugs
Drug Users
Smoking
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Tuberculosis
Crack Cocaine
Exhalation
Unsafe Sex
Alcoholic Intoxication
Infectious Disease Transmission
Heroin
Syringes
Firearms
Cannabis
Smoke
Inhalation
Drinking
Mouth
Multivariate Analysis
Education

Keywords

  • Crack cocaine
  • Drug smoking
  • Substance abuse
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Perlman, D. C., Perkins, M. P., Paone, D., Kochems, L., Salomon, N., Friedmann, P., & Des Jarlais, D. (1997). 'Shotgunning' as an illicit drug smoking practice. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 14(1), 3-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0740-5472(96)00182-1

'Shotgunning' as an illicit drug smoking practice. / Perlman, David C.; Perkins, Mary Patricia; Paone, Denise; Kochems, Lee; Salomon, Nadim; Friedmann, Patricia; Des Jarlais, Don.

In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 3-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perlman, DC, Perkins, MP, Paone, D, Kochems, L, Salomon, N, Friedmann, P & Des Jarlais, D 1997, ''Shotgunning' as an illicit drug smoking practice', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 3-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0740-5472(96)00182-1
Perlman DC, Perkins MP, Paone D, Kochems L, Salomon N, Friedmann P et al. 'Shotgunning' as an illicit drug smoking practice. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 1997 Jan 1;14(1):3-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0740-5472(96)00182-1
Perlman, David C. ; Perkins, Mary Patricia ; Paone, Denise ; Kochems, Lee ; Salomon, Nadim ; Friedmann, Patricia ; Des Jarlais, Don. / 'Shotgunning' as an illicit drug smoking practice. In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 1997 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 3-9.
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