Short pulse radiation transport in participating media

Sunil Kumar, Kunal Mitra, Ali Vedavarz, Yukio Yamada

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper examines the initial transients of the radiation intensity and flux for a one-dimensional semi-infinite medium where the incident source pulse is of the duration of picoseconds or less. As a first approximation the intensity field is modeled as a linear function of the cosine of the angle, and the coefficients of the linear function are functions of time and position. The mathematical form of the resultant radiative transport equations is of a hyperbolic form with a wave speed equal to 1/√3 of the speed of light in the medium. The incident source travels at the speed of light. Applications where these results are important include the transport of femtosecond and picosecond laser pulses through absorbing and scattering medium such as in the imaging of tissues or probing the characteristics of particulate medium by examining the transmitted or back-scattered transients. The speed of light in vacuum is 0.3 mm/picosec or 0.3 μm/femtosec, and therefore corresponding to the duration of a 1 picosec pulse the penetration distance is only 0.3 mm or for a 100 femtosec pulse only 30 μm. The transient term in the radiative transfer equation, usually neglected, is of the same order of magnitude as the spatial derivative in such situations, and cannot be neglected. The results for a one-dimensional medium obtained by the method of characteristics show a distinct wave nature which asymptotes to the diffusion result at large time after the incident pulse has ended. The time dependent reflectivity of the medium can be correlated to the medium properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFundamentals of Radiation
EditorsF.B. Cheung, Y.A. Hassan, A. Singh
Volume315
Edition13
StatePublished - 1995
EventProceedings of the 1995 30th National Heat Transfer Conference. Part 14 - Portland, OR, USA
Duration: Aug 6 1995Aug 8 1995

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1995 30th National Heat Transfer Conference. Part 14
CityPortland, OR, USA
Period8/6/958/8/95

Fingerprint

Light velocity
Radiative transfer
Radiation
Laser pulses
Vacuum
Scattering
Tissue
Fluxes
Derivatives
Imaging techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Kumar, S., Mitra, K., Vedavarz, A., & Yamada, Y. (1995). Short pulse radiation transport in participating media. In F. B. Cheung, Y. A. Hassan, & A. Singh (Eds.), Fundamentals of Radiation (13 ed., Vol. 315)

Short pulse radiation transport in participating media. / Kumar, Sunil; Mitra, Kunal; Vedavarz, Ali; Yamada, Yukio.

Fundamentals of Radiation. ed. / F.B. Cheung; Y.A. Hassan; A. Singh. Vol. 315 13. ed. 1995.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kumar, S, Mitra, K, Vedavarz, A & Yamada, Y 1995, Short pulse radiation transport in participating media. in FB Cheung, YA Hassan & A Singh (eds), Fundamentals of Radiation. 13 edn, vol. 315, Proceedings of the 1995 30th National Heat Transfer Conference. Part 14, Portland, OR, USA, 8/6/95.
Kumar S, Mitra K, Vedavarz A, Yamada Y. Short pulse radiation transport in participating media. In Cheung FB, Hassan YA, Singh A, editors, Fundamentals of Radiation. 13 ed. Vol. 315. 1995
Kumar, Sunil ; Mitra, Kunal ; Vedavarz, Ali ; Yamada, Yukio. / Short pulse radiation transport in participating media. Fundamentals of Radiation. editor / F.B. Cheung ; Y.A. Hassan ; A. Singh. Vol. 315 13. ed. 1995.
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