Shift Workers Have Higher Blood Pressure Medicine Use, But Only When They Are Short Sleepers: A Longitudinal UK Biobank Study

Barbara Riegel, Marguerite Daus, Alicia J. Lozano, Susan Malone, Freda Patterson, Alexandra L. Hanlon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Some, but not all, studies report associations between shift work and hypertension, suggesting that particular subgroups may be at risk. We examined moderating effects of sleep duration and circadian preference on the relationship between shift work and new blood pressure (BP) medicine use at follow-up. Methods and Results Baseline and 5-year follow-up data from the UK Biobank cohort (N=9200) were used to generate logistic regression models for shift workers and nonshift workers. The moderating effects of sleep duration (short ≤6 hours; adequate 7-8 hours; long ≥9 hours) and circadian preference (morning "larks;" intermediate; evening "owls") at baseline were examined with new BP medicine use at follow-up, adjusting for age, sex, race, education, employment, urban/rural, cardiovascular disease family history, depression, alcohol intake, physical activity, diet, smoking, and body mass index. The sample was predominately middle aged (55.3±7.4), female (57.3%), and white (97.9%). Most reported adequate sleep duration (7-8 hours, 73.7%) and were intermediate type (65.3%); 8.0% were shift workers at baseline. Only 6.5% reported new BP medicine use at follow-up. Short sleep duration was a significant moderator of new BP medicine use in shift workers. Among short sleepers, shift workers had a 2.1-fold increased odds of new BP medicine use compared with nonshift workers (odds ratio=2.08, 95% CI=1.21-3.58, P=0.008). In those reporting adequate (odds ratio=0.82, 95% CI=0.54-1.25, P=0.35) and long sleep (odds ratio=0.64, 95% CI=0.11-3.54, P=0.60), this relationship was protective but nonsignificant. Interaction between circadian preference and shift work on BP medicine use was nonsignificant. Conclusions Shift workers with short sleep duration may be at risk for hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e013269
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume8
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2019

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Sleep
Medicine
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Odds Ratio
Logistic Models
Strigiformes
Sex Education
Body Mass Index
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Alcohols
Exercise
Depression
Diet

Keywords

  • circadian rhythm
  • hypertension
  • risk factors
  • shift work schedule
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Shift Workers Have Higher Blood Pressure Medicine Use, But Only When They Are Short Sleepers : A Longitudinal UK Biobank Study. / Riegel, Barbara; Daus, Marguerite; Lozano, Alicia J.; Malone, Susan; Patterson, Freda; Hanlon, Alexandra L.

In: Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol. 8, No. 20, 15.10.2019, p. e013269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Riegel, Barbara ; Daus, Marguerite ; Lozano, Alicia J. ; Malone, Susan ; Patterson, Freda ; Hanlon, Alexandra L. / Shift Workers Have Higher Blood Pressure Medicine Use, But Only When They Are Short Sleepers : A Longitudinal UK Biobank Study. In: Journal of the American Heart Association. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 20. pp. e013269.
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AU - Hanlon, Alexandra L.

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N2 - Background Some, but not all, studies report associations between shift work and hypertension, suggesting that particular subgroups may be at risk. We examined moderating effects of sleep duration and circadian preference on the relationship between shift work and new blood pressure (BP) medicine use at follow-up. Methods and Results Baseline and 5-year follow-up data from the UK Biobank cohort (N=9200) were used to generate logistic regression models for shift workers and nonshift workers. The moderating effects of sleep duration (short ≤6 hours; adequate 7-8 hours; long ≥9 hours) and circadian preference (morning "larks;" intermediate; evening "owls") at baseline were examined with new BP medicine use at follow-up, adjusting for age, sex, race, education, employment, urban/rural, cardiovascular disease family history, depression, alcohol intake, physical activity, diet, smoking, and body mass index. The sample was predominately middle aged (55.3±7.4), female (57.3%), and white (97.9%). Most reported adequate sleep duration (7-8 hours, 73.7%) and were intermediate type (65.3%); 8.0% were shift workers at baseline. Only 6.5% reported new BP medicine use at follow-up. Short sleep duration was a significant moderator of new BP medicine use in shift workers. Among short sleepers, shift workers had a 2.1-fold increased odds of new BP medicine use compared with nonshift workers (odds ratio=2.08, 95% CI=1.21-3.58, P=0.008). In those reporting adequate (odds ratio=0.82, 95% CI=0.54-1.25, P=0.35) and long sleep (odds ratio=0.64, 95% CI=0.11-3.54, P=0.60), this relationship was protective but nonsignificant. Interaction between circadian preference and shift work on BP medicine use was nonsignificant. Conclusions Shift workers with short sleep duration may be at risk for hypertension.

AB - Background Some, but not all, studies report associations between shift work and hypertension, suggesting that particular subgroups may be at risk. We examined moderating effects of sleep duration and circadian preference on the relationship between shift work and new blood pressure (BP) medicine use at follow-up. Methods and Results Baseline and 5-year follow-up data from the UK Biobank cohort (N=9200) were used to generate logistic regression models for shift workers and nonshift workers. The moderating effects of sleep duration (short ≤6 hours; adequate 7-8 hours; long ≥9 hours) and circadian preference (morning "larks;" intermediate; evening "owls") at baseline were examined with new BP medicine use at follow-up, adjusting for age, sex, race, education, employment, urban/rural, cardiovascular disease family history, depression, alcohol intake, physical activity, diet, smoking, and body mass index. The sample was predominately middle aged (55.3±7.4), female (57.3%), and white (97.9%). Most reported adequate sleep duration (7-8 hours, 73.7%) and were intermediate type (65.3%); 8.0% were shift workers at baseline. Only 6.5% reported new BP medicine use at follow-up. Short sleep duration was a significant moderator of new BP medicine use in shift workers. Among short sleepers, shift workers had a 2.1-fold increased odds of new BP medicine use compared with nonshift workers (odds ratio=2.08, 95% CI=1.21-3.58, P=0.008). In those reporting adequate (odds ratio=0.82, 95% CI=0.54-1.25, P=0.35) and long sleep (odds ratio=0.64, 95% CI=0.11-3.54, P=0.60), this relationship was protective but nonsignificant. Interaction between circadian preference and shift work on BP medicine use was nonsignificant. Conclusions Shift workers with short sleep duration may be at risk for hypertension.

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