Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

Mena Youssef, Theodore Hueckel, Gi Ra Yi, Stefano Sacanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number12216
JournalNature Communications
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 18 2016

Fingerprint

Semiconductors
Colloids
Surface-Active Agents
drying
colloids
Polymers
Oils
Research Design
Biological systems
assembling
magnetic materials
engineers
optical communication
self assembly
platforms
oils
Magnetic materials
surfactants
engineering
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting. / Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi Ra; Sacanna, Stefano.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 7, 12216, 18.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Youssef, Mena ; Hueckel, Theodore ; Yi, Gi Ra ; Sacanna, Stefano. / Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting. In: Nature Communications. 2016 ; Vol. 7.
@article{d9e45fb6e02c4d0ba05be3e14120ddca,
title = "Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting",
abstract = "The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.",
author = "Mena Youssef and Theodore Hueckel and Yi, {Gi Ra} and Stefano Sacanna",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1038/ncomms12216",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

AU - Youssef, Mena

AU - Hueckel, Theodore

AU - Yi, Gi Ra

AU - Sacanna, Stefano

PY - 2016/7/18

Y1 - 2016/7/18

N2 - The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

AB - The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978805148&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978805148&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/ncomms12216

DO - 10.1038/ncomms12216

M3 - Article

VL - 7

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

M1 - 12216

ER -