Sexual Stigma, Criminalization, Investment, and Access to HIV Services Among Men Who Have Sex with Men Worldwide

Sonya Arreola, Glenn Milo Santos, Jack Beck, Mohan Sundararaj, Patrick A. Wilson, Pato Hebert, Keletso Makofane, Tri D. Do, George Ayala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Globally, HIV disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM). This study explored associations between access to HIV services and (1) individual-level perceived sexual stigma; (2) country-level criminalization of homosexuality; and (3) country-level investment in HIV services for MSM. 3,340 MSM completed an online survey assessing access to HIV services. MSM from over 115 countries were categorized according to criminalization of homosexuality policy and investment in HIV services targeting MSM. Lower access to condoms, lubricants, and HIV testing were each associated with greater perceived sexual stigma, existence of homosexuality criminalization policies, and less investment in HIV services. Lower access to HIV treatment was associated with greater perceived sexual stigma and criminalization. Criminalization of homosexuality and low investment in HIV services were both associated with greater perceived sexual stigma. Efforts to prevent and treat HIV among MSM should be coupled with structural interventions to reduce stigma, overturn homosexuality criminalization policies, and increase investment in MSM-specific HIV services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-234
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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HIV
Homosexuality
Lubricants
Condoms
HIV-1

Keywords

  • Access to HIV services
  • Country level investment in MSM–HIV services
  • Criminalization of homosexuality
  • Men who have sex with men (MSM)
  • Sexual stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sexual Stigma, Criminalization, Investment, and Access to HIV Services Among Men Who Have Sex with Men Worldwide. / Arreola, Sonya; Santos, Glenn Milo; Beck, Jack; Sundararaj, Mohan; Wilson, Patrick A.; Hebert, Pato; Makofane, Keletso; Do, Tri D.; Ayala, George.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2015, p. 227-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arreola, S, Santos, GM, Beck, J, Sundararaj, M, Wilson, PA, Hebert, P, Makofane, K, Do, TD & Ayala, G 2015, 'Sexual Stigma, Criminalization, Investment, and Access to HIV Services Among Men Who Have Sex with Men Worldwide', AIDS and Behavior, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 227-234. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-014-0869-x
Arreola, Sonya ; Santos, Glenn Milo ; Beck, Jack ; Sundararaj, Mohan ; Wilson, Patrick A. ; Hebert, Pato ; Makofane, Keletso ; Do, Tri D. ; Ayala, George. / Sexual Stigma, Criminalization, Investment, and Access to HIV Services Among Men Who Have Sex with Men Worldwide. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 227-234.
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