Sexual risk taking in relation to sexual identification, age, and education in a diverse sample of African American men who have sex with men (MSM) in New York City

Melvin C. Hampton, Perry N. Halkitis, Erik D. Storholm, Sandra A. Kupprat, Daniel E. Siconolfi, Donovan Jones, Jeff T. Steen, Sara Gillen, Donna Hubbard McCree

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

HIV disproportionately affects African American men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. To inform this epidemiological pattern, we examined cross-sectional sexual behavior data in 509 African American MSM. Bivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the extent to which age, education, and sexual identity explain the likelihood of engaging in sex with a partner of a specific gender and the likelihood of engaging in unprotected sexual behaviors based on partner gender. Across all partner gender types, unprotected sexual behaviors were more likely to be reported by men with lower education. Younger, non-gay identified men were more likely to engage in unprotected sexual behaviors with transgender partners, while older, non-gay identified men were more likely to engage in unprotected sexual behaviors with women. African American MSM do not represent a monolithic group in their sexual behaviors, highlighting the need to target HIV prevention efforts to different subsets of African American MSM communities as appropriate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)931-938
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

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Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
African Americans
Education
HIV
Transgender Persons
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • African American MSM
  • Age
  • Education
  • HIV
  • Sexual identity
  • Sexual risk-taking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Sexual risk taking in relation to sexual identification, age, and education in a diverse sample of African American men who have sex with men (MSM) in New York City. / Hampton, Melvin C.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Storholm, Erik D.; Kupprat, Sandra A.; Siconolfi, Daniel E.; Jones, Donovan; Steen, Jeff T.; Gillen, Sara; McCree, Donna Hubbard.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 17, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 931-938.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hampton, MC, Halkitis, PN, Storholm, ED, Kupprat, SA, Siconolfi, DE, Jones, D, Steen, JT, Gillen, S & McCree, DH 2013, 'Sexual risk taking in relation to sexual identification, age, and education in a diverse sample of African American men who have sex with men (MSM) in New York City', AIDS and Behavior, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 931-938. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-012-0139-8
Hampton, Melvin C. ; Halkitis, Perry N. ; Storholm, Erik D. ; Kupprat, Sandra A. ; Siconolfi, Daniel E. ; Jones, Donovan ; Steen, Jeff T. ; Gillen, Sara ; McCree, Donna Hubbard. / Sexual risk taking in relation to sexual identification, age, and education in a diverse sample of African American men who have sex with men (MSM) in New York City. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2013 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 931-938.
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