Sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men: What's in a label?

Trevor A. Hart, Richard J. Wolitski, David W. Purcell, Cynthia Gómez, Perry Halkitis, Michael Stirratt, Robert Remien, Jeffrey Parsons, Ann O'Leary, Colleen Hoff, Robert Hays, James Carey, Timothy Ambrose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Relatively little attention has been paid to the use and importance of labels used by men who have sex with men to describe insertive or receptive sexual behavior during intercourse. This study examines sexual self-labels, sexual behavior, HIV transmission risk, and psychological functioning among 205 HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men. The majority of participants (88%) identified as a "top," a "bottom," or "versatile." Tops were more likely to engage in insertive anal intercourse than bottoms, and bottoms were more likely to engage in receptive anal intercourse than tops, with versatiles reporting intermediate rates of both behaviors. Although the results suggest preliminary evidence regarding the predictive utility of self-labels, sexual behaviors of self-label groups were greatly overlapping. Differences were found among self-label groups in gay self-identification, internalized homophobia, sexual sensation seeking, and anxiety. Results suggest an added value in assessing self-labels in addition to asking about sexual behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-188
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Sex Research
Volume40
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 2003

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Sexual Behavior
HIV
Homophobia
value added
Anxiety
Psychology
Group
AIDS/HIV
anxiety
evidence
Sexual

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Hart, T. A., Wolitski, R. J., Purcell, D. W., Gómez, C., Halkitis, P., Stirratt, M., ... Ambrose, T. (2003). Sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men: What's in a label? Journal of Sex Research, 40(2), 179-188.

Sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men : What's in a label? / Hart, Trevor A.; Wolitski, Richard J.; Purcell, David W.; Gómez, Cynthia; Halkitis, Perry; Stirratt, Michael; Remien, Robert; Parsons, Jeffrey; O'Leary, Ann; Hoff, Colleen; Hays, Robert; Carey, James; Ambrose, Timothy.

In: Journal of Sex Research, Vol. 40, No. 2, 05.2003, p. 179-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hart, TA, Wolitski, RJ, Purcell, DW, Gómez, C, Halkitis, P, Stirratt, M, Remien, R, Parsons, J, O'Leary, A, Hoff, C, Hays, R, Carey, J & Ambrose, T 2003, 'Sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men: What's in a label?', Journal of Sex Research, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 179-188.
Hart TA, Wolitski RJ, Purcell DW, Gómez C, Halkitis P, Stirratt M et al. Sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men: What's in a label? Journal of Sex Research. 2003 May;40(2):179-188.
Hart, Trevor A. ; Wolitski, Richard J. ; Purcell, David W. ; Gómez, Cynthia ; Halkitis, Perry ; Stirratt, Michael ; Remien, Robert ; Parsons, Jeffrey ; O'Leary, Ann ; Hoff, Colleen ; Hays, Robert ; Carey, James ; Ambrose, Timothy. / Sexual behavior among HIV-positive men who have sex with men : What's in a label?. In: Journal of Sex Research. 2003 ; Vol. 40, No. 2. pp. 179-188.
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