Serum IgG antibody response to periodontal pathogens in minority populations

Relationship to periodontal disease status and progression

Ronald Craig, Robert Boylan, Julie Yip, Dindo Mijares, Mohammed Imam, Sigmund S. Socransky, Martin A. Taubman, Anne D. Haffajee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Differences in periodontal disease prevalence, severity, subgingival microflora and host immune response have been reported for various ethnic/racial groups, which implies that risk factors for destructive periodontal disease progression may also vary in these populations. As it is possible that these differences may be due to confounding variables other than ethnicity/race, we have measured serum IgG antibody response to six periodontal pathogens, and compared these data with microbiological, clinical and demographic parameters in three urban minority populations. The study population consisted of 23 Asiatic, 48 African-American and 37 Hispanic subjects, who were resident in the greater New York region. Clinical indices that were recorded included pocket depth, attachment level, gingival erythema, bleeding upon probing, suppuration and supragingival plaque. Attachment level measurements were taken twice at each visit, and the difference between the means of pairs of measurements taken at baseline and two months later was used to determine disease progression. Subgingival microbiological species were identified and enumerated using DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization. Serum IgG antibody levels to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotyopes a and b, Bacteroides forsythus. Campylobacter rectus, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Mean serum IgG antibody to P. gingivalis was found to be higher in the African-American group, while IgG antibody to B. forsythus was lower in the Hispanic group. However, the African-American group also had greater mean probing depth, attachment loss, number of missing teeth and numbers of individuals within the unskilled occupational group. When the data were analyzed by occupational status, mean serum IgG antibody to P. gingivalis increased from professional to skilled to unskilled groups. For the entire study population, prior disease and subsequent attachment loss were associated with elevated serum IgG antibody to P. gingivalis. Increasing pocket depth, attachment level, gingival erythema and age were also positively correlated with serum IgG antibody to P. gingivalis, but not with serum IgG antibody to the other five subgingival species. No correlation was found between whole-mouth bacterial levels and homologous serum IgG antibody levels. These results suggest that elevated serum IgG antibody to P. gingivalis reflects destructive periodontal disease status, and may be considered a risk factor for disease progression in these ethnic/racial populations. In addition, although.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-146
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Periodontal Research
Volume37
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2002

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Periodontal Diseases
Antibody Formation
Disease Progression
Immunoglobulin G
Porphyromonas gingivalis
Antibodies
Serum
Population
African Americans
Erythema
Hispanic Americans
Campylobacter rectus
Prevotella intermedia
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans
Occupational Groups
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Urban Population
Suppuration
DNA
Ethnic Groups

Keywords

  • Antibody
  • Minorities
  • Periodontal disease
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Serum IgG antibody response to periodontal pathogens in minority populations : Relationship to periodontal disease status and progression. / Craig, Ronald; Boylan, Robert; Yip, Julie; Mijares, Dindo; Imam, Mohammed; Socransky, Sigmund S.; Taubman, Martin A.; Haffajee, Anne D.

In: Journal of Periodontal Research, Vol. 37, No. 2, 04.2002, p. 132-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Craig, Ronald ; Boylan, Robert ; Yip, Julie ; Mijares, Dindo ; Imam, Mohammed ; Socransky, Sigmund S. ; Taubman, Martin A. ; Haffajee, Anne D. / Serum IgG antibody response to periodontal pathogens in minority populations : Relationship to periodontal disease status and progression. In: Journal of Periodontal Research. 2002 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 132-146.
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