Self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes

Hanzhang Xu, Jianfeng Luo, Bei Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background To compare self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24% of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82% of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97% received advice on exercise, 60.37% received diet advice, 35.12% were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89% of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education in comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes education are urgently needed in China.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number020402
JournalJournal of Global Health
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Education
China
Foot
Smoking
Diet
Retirement
Health
Rural Population
Population Groups
Health Personnel
Longitudinal Studies
Life Style
Comorbidity
Exercise
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes. / Xu, Hanzhang; Luo, Jianfeng; Wu, Bei.

In: Journal of Global Health, Vol. 6, No. 2, 020402, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{093562b2e1a14a0498b4a47378edd164,
title = "Self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes",
abstract = "Background To compare self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24{\%} of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82{\%} of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97{\%} received advice on exercise, 60.37{\%} received diet advice, 35.12{\%} were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89{\%} of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education in comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes education are urgently needed in China.",
author = "Hanzhang Xu and Jianfeng Luo and Bei Wu",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.7189/jogh.06.020402",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
journal = "Journal of Global Health",
issn = "2047-2978",
publisher = "Edinburgh University Global Health Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes

AU - Xu, Hanzhang

AU - Luo, Jianfeng

AU - Wu, Bei

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background To compare self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24% of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82% of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97% received advice on exercise, 60.37% received diet advice, 35.12% were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89% of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education in comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes education are urgently needed in China.

AB - Background To compare self-reported diabetes education among Chinese middle-aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24% of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82% of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97% received advice on exercise, 60.37% received diet advice, 35.12% were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89% of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education in comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes education are urgently needed in China.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85010422690&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85010422690&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.7189/jogh.06.020402

DO - 10.7189/jogh.06.020402

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Journal of Global Health

JF - Journal of Global Health

SN - 2047-2978

IS - 2

M1 - 020402

ER -