Self-regulatory problems mediate the association of contextual stressors and unprotected intercourse among rural, African american, young adult men

Steven M. Kogan, Gene H. Brody, Yi Fu Chen, Ralph DiClemente

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this brief report, the hypothesis that self-regulatory problems would mediate the association between contextual stressors and unprotected intercourse among rural African American young adult men was investigated. Family support and religiosity were hypothesized to ameliorate the influence of contextual stressors on self-regulatory problems. Hypotheses were tested on 79 sexually active men from a sample recruited with Respondent Driven Sampling; episodes of unprotected intercourse constituted the criterion variable. Analyses supported the mediating role of self-regulatory problems in linking young adult men's contextual stressors with a heightened likelihood of unprotected intercourse. Religious involvement and family support interacted with contextual stressors to predict diminished associations with self-regulatory problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-57
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Keywords

  • African American
  • rural
  • sexual risk behavior
  • young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Self-regulatory problems mediate the association of contextual stressors and unprotected intercourse among rural, African american, young adult men. / Kogan, Steven M.; Brody, Gene H.; Chen, Yi Fu; DiClemente, Ralph.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 50-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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