Self-Motion Perception

Multisensory Integration in Extrastriate Visual Cortex

Christopher R. Fetsch, Yong Gu, Gregory C. DeAngelis, Dora Angelaki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The accurate perception of self-motion is essential for spatial orientation, navigation, and motor planning. Estimating our instantaneous direction of translation, or heading, is a particularly relevant multisensory problem because it requires cross-modal integration even under ordinary conditions. This chapter discusses how heading perception is a useful model for studying the neural basis of multisensory integration for two main reasons. First, there are well-defined brain structures that receive both visual and vestibular signals related to self-motion (e.g., macaque areas MSTd and VIP). Second, the problem is amenable to study using a standard "fine" psychophysical discrimination task, for which there are already well-established behavioral and neurophysiological analysis methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSensory Cue Integration
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199918379
ISBN (Print)9780195387247
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 20 2012

Fingerprint

Motion Perception
Macaca
Visual Cortex
Brain
Discrimination (Psychology)
Spatial Navigation
Direction compound
Spatial Orientation

Keywords

  • Heading perception
  • Motor planning
  • Multisensory integration
  • Navigation
  • Spatial orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Fetsch, C. R., Gu, Y., DeAngelis, G. C., & Angelaki, D. (2012). Self-Motion Perception: Multisensory Integration in Extrastriate Visual Cortex. In Sensory Cue Integration Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387247.003.0016

Self-Motion Perception : Multisensory Integration in Extrastriate Visual Cortex. / Fetsch, Christopher R.; Gu, Yong; DeAngelis, Gregory C.; Angelaki, Dora.

Sensory Cue Integration. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Fetsch, Christopher R. ; Gu, Yong ; DeAngelis, Gregory C. ; Angelaki, Dora. / Self-Motion Perception : Multisensory Integration in Extrastriate Visual Cortex. Sensory Cue Integration. Oxford University Press, 2012.
@inbook{ea5eb9fc402149caa636030f4592467f,
title = "Self-Motion Perception: Multisensory Integration in Extrastriate Visual Cortex",
abstract = "The accurate perception of self-motion is essential for spatial orientation, navigation, and motor planning. Estimating our instantaneous direction of translation, or heading, is a particularly relevant multisensory problem because it requires cross-modal integration even under ordinary conditions. This chapter discusses how heading perception is a useful model for studying the neural basis of multisensory integration for two main reasons. First, there are well-defined brain structures that receive both visual and vestibular signals related to self-motion (e.g., macaque areas MSTd and VIP). Second, the problem is amenable to study using a standard {"}fine{"} psychophysical discrimination task, for which there are already well-established behavioral and neurophysiological analysis methods.",
keywords = "Heading perception, Motor planning, Multisensory integration, Navigation, Spatial orientation",
author = "Fetsch, {Christopher R.} and Yong Gu and DeAngelis, {Gregory C.} and Dora Angelaki",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387247.003.0016",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780195387247",
booktitle = "Sensory Cue Integration",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Self-Motion Perception

T2 - Multisensory Integration in Extrastriate Visual Cortex

AU - Fetsch, Christopher R.

AU - Gu, Yong

AU - DeAngelis, Gregory C.

AU - Angelaki, Dora

PY - 2012/9/20

Y1 - 2012/9/20

N2 - The accurate perception of self-motion is essential for spatial orientation, navigation, and motor planning. Estimating our instantaneous direction of translation, or heading, is a particularly relevant multisensory problem because it requires cross-modal integration even under ordinary conditions. This chapter discusses how heading perception is a useful model for studying the neural basis of multisensory integration for two main reasons. First, there are well-defined brain structures that receive both visual and vestibular signals related to self-motion (e.g., macaque areas MSTd and VIP). Second, the problem is amenable to study using a standard "fine" psychophysical discrimination task, for which there are already well-established behavioral and neurophysiological analysis methods.

AB - The accurate perception of self-motion is essential for spatial orientation, navigation, and motor planning. Estimating our instantaneous direction of translation, or heading, is a particularly relevant multisensory problem because it requires cross-modal integration even under ordinary conditions. This chapter discusses how heading perception is a useful model for studying the neural basis of multisensory integration for two main reasons. First, there are well-defined brain structures that receive both visual and vestibular signals related to self-motion (e.g., macaque areas MSTd and VIP). Second, the problem is amenable to study using a standard "fine" psychophysical discrimination task, for which there are already well-established behavioral and neurophysiological analysis methods.

KW - Heading perception

KW - Motor planning

KW - Multisensory integration

KW - Navigation

KW - Spatial orientation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84921259620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84921259620&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387247.003.0016

DO - 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195387247.003.0016

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780195387247

BT - Sensory Cue Integration

PB - Oxford University Press

ER -