Self-efficacy as a predictor of self-reported physical, cognitive, and social functioning in multiple sclerosis

Margaret M. Schmitt, Yael Goverover, John DeLuca, Nancy Chiaravalloti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate whether self-efficacy is associated with physical, cognitive, and social functioning in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) when controlling for disease-related characteristics and depressive symptomatology. Method: Study subjects were 81 individuals between the ages of 29 and 67 with a diagnosis of clinically definite MS. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between self-efficacy and self-reported physical, cognitive, and social functioning. Results: Self-efficacy is a significant predictor of self-reported physical, cognitive, and social functioning in MS after controlling for variance due to disease-related factors and depressive symptomatology. Conclusions: Self-efficacy plays a significant role in individual adjustment to MS across multiple areas of functional outcome beyond that which is accounted for by disease-related variables and symptoms of depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Self Efficacy
Multiple Sclerosis
Social Adjustment
Regression Analysis
Depression

Keywords

  • Functional outcomes
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Self-efficacy
  • physical function
  • cognitive function
  • social function
  • depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Self-efficacy as a predictor of self-reported physical, cognitive, and social functioning in multiple sclerosis. / Schmitt, Margaret M.; Goverover, Yael; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy.

In: Rehabilitation Psychology, Vol. 59, No. 1, 2014, p. 27-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmitt, Margaret M. ; Goverover, Yael ; DeLuca, John ; Chiaravalloti, Nancy. / Self-efficacy as a predictor of self-reported physical, cognitive, and social functioning in multiple sclerosis. In: Rehabilitation Psychology. 2014 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 27-34.
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