Self-concealment, social self-efficacy, acculturative stress, and depression in African, Asian, and Latin American international college students

Madonna G. Constantine, Sumie Okazaki, Shawn O. Utsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The primary purpose of this exploratory investigation was to examine self-concealment behaviors and social self-efficacy skills as potential mediators in the relationship between acculturative stress and depression in a sample of 320 African, Asian, and Latin American international college students. The authors found several differences by demography with regard to the study's variables. After controlling for regional group membership, sex, and English language fluency, they found that self-concealment and social self-efficacy did not serve as mediators in the relationship between African, Asian, and Latin American international students' acculturative stress experiences and depressive symptomatology. Implications of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-241
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

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Asian Americans
Self Efficacy
Depression
Students
Language
Demography
College Students
Mediator
African Americans
Concealment
Self-efficacy
Fluency
International Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Self-concealment, social self-efficacy, acculturative stress, and depression in African, Asian, and Latin American international college students. / Constantine, Madonna G.; Okazaki, Sumie; Utsey, Shawn O.

In: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, Vol. 74, No. 3, 07.2004, p. 230-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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