Self-Administered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Moderate to Severe Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Efficacy, Tolerability, Feasibility

Jeffrey M. Lackner, James Jaccard, Susan S. Krasner, Leonard A. Katz, Gregory D. Gudleski, Kenneth Holroyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background & Aims: Given the limitations of conventional therapies and restrictions imposed on newer pharmacologic agents, there is an urgent need to develop efficacious and efficient treatments that teach patients behavioral self-management skills for relieving irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and associated problems. Methods: Seventy-five Rome II diagnosed IBS patients (86% female) without comorbid gastrointestinal disease were recruited from local physicians and the community and randomized to either 2 versions of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) (10-session, therapist-administered CBT vs 4-session, patient-administered CBT) or a wait list control (WLC) that controlled for threats to internal validity. Final assessment occurred 2 weeks after the 10-week treatment phase ended. Outcome measures included adequate relief from pain and bowel symptoms, global improvement of IBS symptoms (CGI-Improvement Scale), IBS symptom severity scale (IBS SSS), quality of life (IBSQOL), psychological distress (Brief Symptom Inventory), and patient satisfaction (Client Satisfaction Scale). Results: At week 12, both CBT versions were significantly (P < .05) superior to WLC in the percentage of participants reporting adequate relief (eg, minimal contact CBT, 72%; standard CBT, 60.9%; WLC, 7.4%) and improvement of symptoms. CBT-treated patients reported significantly improved quality of life and IBS symptom severity but not psychological distress relative to WLC patients (P < .0001). Conclusions: Data from this pilot study lend preliminary empirical support to a brief patient-administered CBT regimen capable of providing short-term relief from IBS symptoms largely unresponsive to conventional therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)899-906
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Cognitive Therapy
Quality of Life
Psychology
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Therapeutics
Self Care
Patient Satisfaction
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians
Pain
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Self-Administered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Moderate to Severe Irritable Bowel Syndrome : Clinical Efficacy, Tolerability, Feasibility. / Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Jaccard, James; Krasner, Susan S.; Katz, Leonard A.; Gudleski, Gregory D.; Holroyd, Kenneth.

In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 6, No. 8, 08.2008, p. 899-906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lackner, Jeffrey M. ; Jaccard, James ; Krasner, Susan S. ; Katz, Leonard A. ; Gudleski, Gregory D. ; Holroyd, Kenneth. / Self-Administered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Moderate to Severe Irritable Bowel Syndrome : Clinical Efficacy, Tolerability, Feasibility. In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2008 ; Vol. 6, No. 8. pp. 899-906.
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