Segmented assimilation: An approach to studying acculturation and obesity among Latino adults in the United States

Karen R. Flórez, Ana Abraido-Lanza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Segmented assimilation theory posits that immigrants experience distinct paths of assimilation. Using cluster analysis and data from the National Latino and Asian American Survey, this study sought to apply this theory in relation to obesity among Latinos. Four clusters emerged: a "second-generation classic," a "thirdgeneration classic," an "underclass," and a "segmented assimilation" pattern. In analyses controlling for sociodemographic confounders (eg, age), second-generation classic individuals had higher odds of obesity (odds ratio = 2.70, 95% confidence interval = 1.47-4.93) relative to the segmented pattern. Similarly, third-generation classic individuals had higher odds of obesity (odds ratio = 3.23, 95% confidence interval = 1.74-6.01) compared with segmented assimilation individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-138
Number of pages7
JournalFamily and Community Health
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Hispanic Americans
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Asian Americans
Cluster Analysis

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Latinos
  • Obesity
  • Segmented assimilation theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Segmented assimilation : An approach to studying acculturation and obesity among Latino adults in the United States. / Flórez, Karen R.; Abraido-Lanza, Ana.

In: Family and Community Health, Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.01.2017, p. 132-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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