Seeing structure through chaos

David J. Heeger, Alex P. Pentland

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Research on motion perception has concentrated on recognizing regularities in images due to rigid motion. Rigid motion, however, is only one type of motion that occurs. There are also elastic motion, fluid motion, and turbulent flow. The authors use a Brownian fractal model of turbulent flow, demonstrate that turbulence can be recognized visually, and suggest how the model can be used to make inferences about the flowing fluid. The recognition procedure is implemented by testing for a fractal scale-invariant regularity across space and time using linear spatiotemporal bandpass filters. These filters are also used to extract optical flow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE Motion Workshop: Representation and Analysis
PublisherIEEE
Pages131-136
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)0818606967
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Chaos theory
Fractals
Turbulent flow
Fluids
Optical flows
Bandpass filters
Turbulence
Testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Heeger, D. J., & Pentland, A. P. (1986). Seeing structure through chaos. In Proceedings of the IEEE Motion Workshop: Representation and Analysis (pp. 131-136). IEEE.

Seeing structure through chaos. / Heeger, David J.; Pentland, Alex P.

Proceedings of the IEEE Motion Workshop: Representation and Analysis. IEEE, 1986. p. 131-136.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Heeger, DJ & Pentland, AP 1986, Seeing structure through chaos. in Proceedings of the IEEE Motion Workshop: Representation and Analysis. IEEE, pp. 131-136.
Heeger DJ, Pentland AP. Seeing structure through chaos. In Proceedings of the IEEE Motion Workshop: Representation and Analysis. IEEE. 1986. p. 131-136
Heeger, David J. ; Pentland, Alex P. / Seeing structure through chaos. Proceedings of the IEEE Motion Workshop: Representation and Analysis. IEEE, 1986. pp. 131-136
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