Safe for generations to come: Considerations of safety for millimeter waves in wireless communications

Ting Wu, Theodore S. Rappaport, Christopher M. Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With the increasing demand for higher data rates and more reliable service capabilities for wireless devices, wireless service providers are facing an unprecedented challenge to overcome a global bandwidth shortage. Early global activities on beyond fourth-generation (B4G) and fifth-generation (5G) wireless communication systems suggest that millimeter-wave (mmWave) frequencies are very promising for future wireless communication networks due to the massive amount of raw bandwidth and potential multigigabit-per-second (Gb/s) data rates [1]?[3]. Both industry and academia have begun the exploration of the untapped mmWave frequency spectrum for future broadband mobile communication networks. In April 2014, the Brooklyn 5G Summit [4], sponsored by Nokia and the New York University (NYU) WIRELESS research center, drew global attention to mmWave communications and channel modeling. In July 2014, the IEEE 802.11 next-generation 60-GHz study group was formed to increase the data rates to over 20 Gb/s in the unlicensed 60-GHz frequency band while maintaining backward compatibility with the emerging IEEE 802.11ad wireless local area network (WLAN) standard [5].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7032050
Pages (from-to)65-84
Number of pages20
JournalIEEE Microwave Magazine
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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wireless communication
Millimeter waves
millimeter waves
safety
communication networks
Communication
Telecommunication networks
bandwidth
local area networks
Bandwidth
compatibility
telecommunication
emerging
communication
Wireless local area networks (WLAN)
industries
Frequency bands
broadband
Communication systems
Industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Radiation
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Safe for generations to come : Considerations of safety for millimeter waves in wireless communications. / Wu, Ting; Rappaport, Theodore S.; Collins, Christopher M.

In: IEEE Microwave Magazine, Vol. 16, No. 2, 7032050, 01.03.2015, p. 65-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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