RNAi analysis of genes expressed in the ovary of Caenorhabditis elegans

Fabio Piano, Aaron J. Schetter, Marco Mangone, Lincoln Stein, Kenneth J. Kemphues

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As a step towards comprehensive functional analysis of genomes, systematic gene knockout projects have been initiated in several organisms [1]. In metazoans like C. elegans, however, maternal contribution can mask the effects of gene knockouts on embryogenesis. RNA interference (RNAi) provides an alternative rapid approach to obtain loss-of-function information that can also reveal embryonic roles for the genes targeted [2,3]. We have used RNAi to analyze a random set of ovarian transcripts and have identified 81 genes with essential roles in embryogenesis. Surprisingly, none of them maps on the X chromosome. Of these 81 genes, 68 showed defects before the eight-cell stage and could be grouped into ten phenotypic classes. To archive and distribute these data we have developed a database system directly linked to the C. elegans database (Wormbase). We conclude that screening cDNA libraries by RNAi is an efficient way of obtaining in vivo function for a large group of genes. Furthermore, this approach is directly applicable to other organisms sensitive to RNAi and whose genomes have not yet been sequenced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1619-1622
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume10
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 14 2000

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Caenorhabditis elegans
RNA Interference
RNA interference
Ovary
Genes
RNA
Gene Knockout Techniques
gene targeting
Embryonic Development
embryogenesis
genes
Genome
Databases
genome
Essential Genes
organisms
X Chromosome
X chromosome
Masks
Gene Library

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

RNAi analysis of genes expressed in the ovary of Caenorhabditis elegans. / Piano, Fabio; Schetter, Aaron J.; Mangone, Marco; Stein, Lincoln; Kemphues, Kenneth J.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 10, No. 24, 14.12.2000, p. 1619-1622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piano, F, Schetter, AJ, Mangone, M, Stein, L & Kemphues, KJ 2000, 'RNAi analysis of genes expressed in the ovary of Caenorhabditis elegans', Current Biology, vol. 10, no. 24, pp. 1619-1622. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0960-9822(00)00869-1
Piano, Fabio ; Schetter, Aaron J. ; Mangone, Marco ; Stein, Lincoln ; Kemphues, Kenneth J. / RNAi analysis of genes expressed in the ovary of Caenorhabditis elegans. In: Current Biology. 2000 ; Vol. 10, No. 24. pp. 1619-1622.
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