Risk-taking behaviors of gay and bisexual men in New York city post 9/11

Lindsay S. Espinosa, Chelsea B. Maddock, Hannah W. Osier, Stephanie A. Doig, Perry N. Halkitis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Until now, the reactions of gay and bisexual populations have been largely overlooked in response to terror and disaster. This study assesses risk-taking behaviors in gay and bisexual men two weeks before and after the 9/11 attacks in Manhattan. For the purposes of this study, risk-taking behaviors include drug use and unprotected anal sex. These behaviors and associated desires were examined in relation to race/ethnicity, age, geographic location, and HIV status, within and across time. The results of this study demonstrate that HIV status may be a pivotal demographic feature in understanding risk-taking behaviors post disaster. No changes in drug use were reported pre and post 9/11. However, there was an increase in risky sexual behaviors in relation to serostatus, with HIV-positive men reporting a higher number of sexual partners post 9/11. In contrast, the number of sexual partners remained constant in HIV-negative men. There was also an interaction effect, demonstrating that HIV-positive men were more likely than HIV-negative men to act on their desire for sex. Thus, as a population already faced with the prospect of death, HIV-positive men may be a population more vulnerable in the face of terror and disaster.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)862-877
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
Volume57
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
HIV
Disasters
disaster
Sexual Partners
drug use
terrorism
Sexual Behavior
Race Relations
Unsafe Sex
Geographic Locations
Vulnerable Populations
Sexual Minorities
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
ethnicity
death
Demography
interaction

Keywords

  • 911
  • Bisexual
  • Drug use
  • Gay
  • Risk taking
  • Sexual behavior
  • Terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Espinosa, L. S., Maddock, C. B., Osier, H. W., Doig, S. A., & Halkitis, P. N. (2010). Risk-taking behaviors of gay and bisexual men in New York city post 9/11. Journal of Homosexuality, 57(7), 862-877. https://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2010.493422

Risk-taking behaviors of gay and bisexual men in New York city post 9/11. / Espinosa, Lindsay S.; Maddock, Chelsea B.; Osier, Hannah W.; Doig, Stephanie A.; Halkitis, Perry N.

In: Journal of Homosexuality, Vol. 57, No. 7, 2010, p. 862-877.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Espinosa, LS, Maddock, CB, Osier, HW, Doig, SA & Halkitis, PN 2010, 'Risk-taking behaviors of gay and bisexual men in New York city post 9/11', Journal of Homosexuality, vol. 57, no. 7, pp. 862-877. https://doi.org/10.1080/00918369.2010.493422
Espinosa, Lindsay S. ; Maddock, Chelsea B. ; Osier, Hannah W. ; Doig, Stephanie A. ; Halkitis, Perry N. / Risk-taking behaviors of gay and bisexual men in New York city post 9/11. In: Journal of Homosexuality. 2010 ; Vol. 57, No. 7. pp. 862-877.
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