Revisiting the effect of reminders on infants' media memories: Does the encoding format matter?

Rachel Barr, Natalie Brito, Gabrielle Simcock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With the present research, the authors examined whether reminders could maintain 18-month-olds' memories generated from picture books and videos. Infants (N = 98) were shown a series of target actions in a picture book or on video. Either 24 hr or 2 weeks prior to a 4-week deferred imitation test, they were exposed to a reminder, a partial presentation of the original media demonstration. After both reminder delays, groups that received a video demonstration and a video reminder (video/video) performed significantly better than did the video-reminder-only control group (x/video), but groups that received a picture-book demonstration and a picture-book reminder (book/book) did not perform better than did the picture-book-reminder-only control (x/book). Additionally, if reminders did not veridically match the conditions of encoding (e.g., video demonstration and a book reminder, video/book or vice versa), infants also failed to perform better than controls. Theoretical implications for the understanding of long-term memory processing during early childhood and practical implications for early multimedia usage are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2112-2119
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume49
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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infant
video
Multimedia
Long-Term Memory
Group
imitation
multimedia
childhood
Control Groups
Research

Keywords

  • Imitation
  • Infants
  • Media
  • Memory
  • Reminders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Revisiting the effect of reminders on infants' media memories : Does the encoding format matter? / Barr, Rachel; Brito, Natalie; Simcock, Gabrielle.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 49, No. 11, 11.2013, p. 2112-2119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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