Revisiting electoral volatility in post-communist countries: New data, new results and new approaches

Eleanor Neff Powell, Joshua Tucker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article provides a detailed set of coding rules for disaggregating electoral volatility into two components: volatility caused by new party entry and old party exit, and volatility caused by vote switching across existing parties. After providing an overview of both types of volatility in post-communist countries, the causes of volatility are analysed using a larger dataset than those used in previous studies. The results are startling: most findings based on elections in post-communist countries included in previous studies disappear. Instead, entry and exit volatility is found to be largely a function of long-term economic recovery, and it becomes clear that very little is known about what causes 'party switching' volatility. As a robustness test of this latter result, the authors demonstrate that systematic explanations for party-switching volatility in Western Europe can indeed be found.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)123-147
    Number of pages25
    JournalBritish Journal of Political Science
    Volume44
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 2014

    Fingerprint

    cause
    Western Europe
    coding
    voter
    election
    economics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Revisiting electoral volatility in post-communist countries : New data, new results and new approaches. / Powell, Eleanor Neff; Tucker, Joshua.

    In: British Journal of Political Science, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 123-147.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{2c34aa371cbf4bc683f0e310b610ffe5,
    title = "Revisiting electoral volatility in post-communist countries: New data, new results and new approaches",
    abstract = "This article provides a detailed set of coding rules for disaggregating electoral volatility into two components: volatility caused by new party entry and old party exit, and volatility caused by vote switching across existing parties. After providing an overview of both types of volatility in post-communist countries, the causes of volatility are analysed using a larger dataset than those used in previous studies. The results are startling: most findings based on elections in post-communist countries included in previous studies disappear. Instead, entry and exit volatility is found to be largely a function of long-term economic recovery, and it becomes clear that very little is known about what causes 'party switching' volatility. As a robustness test of this latter result, the authors demonstrate that systematic explanations for party-switching volatility in Western Europe can indeed be found.",
    author = "Powell, {Eleanor Neff} and Joshua Tucker",
    year = "2014",
    month = "1",
    doi = "10.1017/S0007123412000531",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "44",
    pages = "123--147",
    journal = "British Journal of Political Science",
    issn = "0007-1234",
    publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Revisiting electoral volatility in post-communist countries

    T2 - New data, new results and new approaches

    AU - Powell, Eleanor Neff

    AU - Tucker, Joshua

    PY - 2014/1

    Y1 - 2014/1

    N2 - This article provides a detailed set of coding rules for disaggregating electoral volatility into two components: volatility caused by new party entry and old party exit, and volatility caused by vote switching across existing parties. After providing an overview of both types of volatility in post-communist countries, the causes of volatility are analysed using a larger dataset than those used in previous studies. The results are startling: most findings based on elections in post-communist countries included in previous studies disappear. Instead, entry and exit volatility is found to be largely a function of long-term economic recovery, and it becomes clear that very little is known about what causes 'party switching' volatility. As a robustness test of this latter result, the authors demonstrate that systematic explanations for party-switching volatility in Western Europe can indeed be found.

    AB - This article provides a detailed set of coding rules for disaggregating electoral volatility into two components: volatility caused by new party entry and old party exit, and volatility caused by vote switching across existing parties. After providing an overview of both types of volatility in post-communist countries, the causes of volatility are analysed using a larger dataset than those used in previous studies. The results are startling: most findings based on elections in post-communist countries included in previous studies disappear. Instead, entry and exit volatility is found to be largely a function of long-term economic recovery, and it becomes clear that very little is known about what causes 'party switching' volatility. As a robustness test of this latter result, the authors demonstrate that systematic explanations for party-switching volatility in Western Europe can indeed be found.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881515437&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881515437&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1017/S0007123412000531

    DO - 10.1017/S0007123412000531

    M3 - Article

    VL - 44

    SP - 123

    EP - 147

    JO - British Journal of Political Science

    JF - British Journal of Political Science

    SN - 0007-1234

    IS - 1

    ER -