Resolving paradoxical criteria for the expansion and replication of early childhood care and education programs

Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Elisa Altman Rosman, JoAnn Hsueh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Conceptual bases of intervention and policy are often subject to paradoxical dilemmas, such as the need for a coherent program model versus recognition of the diversity of a target population. This article aims to identify underlying paradoxical bases for expansion and replication of early childhood care and education programs, and to suggest potential resolutions of these paradoxes. Clarification of such paradoxes may provide guidance for the many decision points which arise in processes of identifying, expanding, and replicating early childhood programs based on evidence of quality or success. First, a brief history of early childhood care and education in the U.S. from the viewpoint of expansion and replication is presented. A five-fold typology of expansion and replication processes is proposed: staged replication, franchised replication, multi-site demonstrations, mandated replication, and government-supported private sector expansion. Second, paradoxes associated with the process of replication are considered, such as: (1) the "can it work" versus "does it work" paradox; (2) the fidelity versus local cultural relevance paradox; (3) the replication versus addition paradox; (4) the replication versus program improvement paradox; and (5) the representativeness versus feasibility paradox. In a concluding section, recommendations for funders, policy makers, and evaluators are made regarding next steps in expansion and replication of early childhood care and education programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-27
Number of pages25
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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early childhood education and care
Education
Private Sector
Health Services Needs and Demand
Administrative Personnel
private sector
typology
childhood
history
evidence

Keywords

  • Child care
  • Early childhood intervention
  • Head start
  • Poverty
  • Public policy
  • Replication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Resolving paradoxical criteria for the expansion and replication of early childhood care and education programs. / Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Rosman, Elisa Altman; Hsueh, JoAnn.

In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2002, p. 3-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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