Research challenges to the study of HIV/AIDS among migrant and immigrant hispanic populations in the United States

Sherry Deren, Michele Shedlin, Carlos U. Decena, Milton Mino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Migrant populations have been found to be at risk of HIV/AIDS. The growth in immigrant and migrant Hispanic populations in the United States increases the need to enhance understanding of influences on their HIV-risk behaviors. Four challenges to conducting research among these populations were identified: (1) the need to use multilevel theoretical frameworks; (2) the need to differentiate between Hispanic subgroups; (3) challenges to recruitment and data collection; and (4) ethical issues. This article describes how two studies of Hispanic immigrants and migrants in the New York area addressed these challenges. One study focused on new immigrants from Mexico, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, and a second study focused on Puerto Rican drug users. Both studies incorporated qualitative and quantitative methods to study these hard-to-reach populations. Continued study of the sociocultural and contextual factors affecting HIV risk for mobile populations, and addressing the research challenges, is crucial to developing effective intervention programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume82
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
migrant
immigrant
HIV
Research
Population
El Salvador
Honduras
Dominican Republic
Guatemala
Risk-Taking
Drug Users
quantitative method
risk behavior
Ethics
qualitative method
Mexico
drug

Keywords

  • Hispanics
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Immigrants
  • Migrants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Research challenges to the study of HIV/AIDS among migrant and immigrant hispanic populations in the United States. / Deren, Sherry; Shedlin, Michele; Decena, Carlos U.; Mino, Milton.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 82, No. SUPPL. 3, 06.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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