Religion and the acceptability of white-collar crime: A cross-national analysis

Katie E. Corcoran, David Pettinicchio, Blaine Robbins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines whether shared religious beliefs and religious social relationships (Durkheim) and belief in a personal, moral God (Stark) negatively affect attitudes toward the acceptability of white-collar crime. In addition, using a large cross-national sample and estimating multilevel models, we test whether effects are conditional on modernization and religious contexts characterized by belief in an impersonal or amoral God. Shared religious beliefs and the importance of God in one's life are negatively related to the acceptability of white-collar crime. These effects, however, weaken in religious contexts characterized by belief in an impersonal or amoral God as do the effects of religious social relationships and belonging to a religious organization; modernization, on the other hand, does not have a moderating effect. In short, religious belief is associated with lower acceptance of white-collar crime and certain types of religious contexts condition this relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)542-567
Number of pages26
JournalJournal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

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Acceptability
Crime
Religion
Deity
Religious Beliefs
Modernization
Impersonals
Social Relationships
Religious Organizations
Acceptance
Emile Durkheim

Keywords

  • Durkheim
  • Modernization
  • Moral communities
  • Religious belief
  • Stark
  • White-collar crime

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies

Cite this

Religion and the acceptability of white-collar crime : A cross-national analysis. / Corcoran, Katie E.; Pettinicchio, David; Robbins, Blaine.

In: Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 542-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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