Relationship between self-reported racial composition of high school and health literacy among community health center patients

Kimberly A. Kaphingst, Melody Goodman, Owen Pyke, Jewel Stafford, Christina Lachance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Intervention and policy approaches targeting the societal factors that affect health literacy (e.g., educational systems) could have promise to improve health outcomes, but little research has investigated these factors. This study examined the associations between self-reported racial composition of prior educational and neighborhood contexts and health literacy among 1,061 English-and Spanish-speaking adult community health center patients. The authors found that self-reported racial composition of high school was a significant predictor of health literacy among those who received schooling in the United States, controlling for race/ethnicity, education, age, country of birth, and survey language. Black and Hispanic patients had significantly lower health literacy than White patients within educational strata among those schooled in the United States. The findings revealed substantial disparities in health literacy. Self-reported racial composition of school context was a significant predictor of health literacy. Transdisciplinary, multilevel intervention approaches are likely to be needed to address the health literacy needs of this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-44
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Community Health Centers
School Health Services
Health Centers
High School
Literacy
Health
Hispanic Americans
Language
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition
Education

Keywords

  • community health centers
  • health disparities
  • health literacy
  • residential segregation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Relationship between self-reported racial composition of high school and health literacy among community health center patients. / Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Pyke, Owen; Stafford, Jewel; Lachance, Christina.

In: Health Education and Behavior, Vol. 39, No. 1, 02.2012, p. 35-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaphingst, Kimberly A. ; Goodman, Melody ; Pyke, Owen ; Stafford, Jewel ; Lachance, Christina. / Relationship between self-reported racial composition of high school and health literacy among community health center patients. In: Health Education and Behavior. 2012 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 35-44.
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