Relationship between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and carotid artery plaque: The oral infections and vascular disease epidemiology study (INVEST)

Moïse Desvarieux, Ryan T. Demmer, Tatjana Rundek, Bernadette Boden-Albala, David R. Jacobs, Panos N. Papapanou, Ralph L. Sacco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Purpose - Chronic infections, including periodontal infections, may predispose to cardiovascular disease. The present study investigates the relationship of periodontal disease and tooth loss with subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods - We enrolled 711 subjects with a mean age of 66±9 years and no history of stroke or myocardial infarction in the Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study. Subjects received a comprehensive periodontal examination, extensive in-person cardiovascular disease risk factor measurements, and a carotid scan using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. Regression models were adjusted for conventional risk factors (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, race-ethnicity, education, physical activity) and markers of cultural background, healthy lifestyle, and psychosocial health. Results - Measures of both current and cumulative periodontitis became more severe as tooth loss increased. A significant association was observed between tooth loss levels and carotid artery plaque prevalence. Among those with 0 to 9 missing teeth, 46% had carotid artery plaque, whereas among those with ≥10 missing teeth, carotid artery plaque prevalence was ≈60% (P<0.05). Conclusions - Our data suggest that tooth loss is a marker of past periodontal disease in this population and is related to subclinical atherosclerosis, thereby providing a potential pathway for a relationship with clinical events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2120-2125
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume34
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

Fingerprint

Mouth Diseases
Tooth Loss
Carotid Stenosis
Periodontal Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Epidemiology
Infection
Atherosclerosis
Tooth
Cardiovascular Diseases
Blood Pressure
Periodontitis
HDL Cholesterol
Smoking
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Exercise
Education
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Infection
  • Periodontal disease
  • Tooth loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Relationship between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and carotid artery plaque : The oral infections and vascular disease epidemiology study (INVEST). / Desvarieux, Moïse; Demmer, Ryan T.; Rundek, Tatjana; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Jacobs, David R.; Papapanou, Panos N.; Sacco, Ralph L.

In: Stroke, Vol. 34, No. 9, 01.09.2003, p. 2120-2125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Desvarieux, Moïse ; Demmer, Ryan T. ; Rundek, Tatjana ; Boden-Albala, Bernadette ; Jacobs, David R. ; Papapanou, Panos N. ; Sacco, Ralph L. / Relationship between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and carotid artery plaque : The oral infections and vascular disease epidemiology study (INVEST). In: Stroke. 2003 ; Vol. 34, No. 9. pp. 2120-2125.
@article{1035c740242548bc938afb646051d73f,
title = "Relationship between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and carotid artery plaque: The oral infections and vascular disease epidemiology study (INVEST)",
abstract = "Background and Purpose - Chronic infections, including periodontal infections, may predispose to cardiovascular disease. The present study investigates the relationship of periodontal disease and tooth loss with subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods - We enrolled 711 subjects with a mean age of 66±9 years and no history of stroke or myocardial infarction in the Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study. Subjects received a comprehensive periodontal examination, extensive in-person cardiovascular disease risk factor measurements, and a carotid scan using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. Regression models were adjusted for conventional risk factors (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, race-ethnicity, education, physical activity) and markers of cultural background, healthy lifestyle, and psychosocial health. Results - Measures of both current and cumulative periodontitis became more severe as tooth loss increased. A significant association was observed between tooth loss levels and carotid artery plaque prevalence. Among those with 0 to 9 missing teeth, 46{\%} had carotid artery plaque, whereas among those with ≥10 missing teeth, carotid artery plaque prevalence was ≈60{\%} (P<0.05). Conclusions - Our data suggest that tooth loss is a marker of past periodontal disease in this population and is related to subclinical atherosclerosis, thereby providing a potential pathway for a relationship with clinical events.",
keywords = "Atherosclerosis, Infection, Periodontal disease, Tooth loss",
author = "Mo{\"i}se Desvarieux and Demmer, {Ryan T.} and Tatjana Rundek and Bernadette Boden-Albala and Jacobs, {David R.} and Papapanou, {Panos N.} and Sacco, {Ralph L.}",
year = "2003",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1161/01.STR.0000085086.50957.22",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "2120--2125",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between periodontal disease, tooth loss, and carotid artery plaque

T2 - The oral infections and vascular disease epidemiology study (INVEST)

AU - Desvarieux, Moïse

AU - Demmer, Ryan T.

AU - Rundek, Tatjana

AU - Boden-Albala, Bernadette

AU - Jacobs, David R.

AU - Papapanou, Panos N.

AU - Sacco, Ralph L.

PY - 2003/9/1

Y1 - 2003/9/1

N2 - Background and Purpose - Chronic infections, including periodontal infections, may predispose to cardiovascular disease. The present study investigates the relationship of periodontal disease and tooth loss with subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods - We enrolled 711 subjects with a mean age of 66±9 years and no history of stroke or myocardial infarction in the Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study. Subjects received a comprehensive periodontal examination, extensive in-person cardiovascular disease risk factor measurements, and a carotid scan using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. Regression models were adjusted for conventional risk factors (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, race-ethnicity, education, physical activity) and markers of cultural background, healthy lifestyle, and psychosocial health. Results - Measures of both current and cumulative periodontitis became more severe as tooth loss increased. A significant association was observed between tooth loss levels and carotid artery plaque prevalence. Among those with 0 to 9 missing teeth, 46% had carotid artery plaque, whereas among those with ≥10 missing teeth, carotid artery plaque prevalence was ≈60% (P<0.05). Conclusions - Our data suggest that tooth loss is a marker of past periodontal disease in this population and is related to subclinical atherosclerosis, thereby providing a potential pathway for a relationship with clinical events.

AB - Background and Purpose - Chronic infections, including periodontal infections, may predispose to cardiovascular disease. The present study investigates the relationship of periodontal disease and tooth loss with subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods - We enrolled 711 subjects with a mean age of 66±9 years and no history of stroke or myocardial infarction in the Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study. Subjects received a comprehensive periodontal examination, extensive in-person cardiovascular disease risk factor measurements, and a carotid scan using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. Regression models were adjusted for conventional risk factors (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, race-ethnicity, education, physical activity) and markers of cultural background, healthy lifestyle, and psychosocial health. Results - Measures of both current and cumulative periodontitis became more severe as tooth loss increased. A significant association was observed between tooth loss levels and carotid artery plaque prevalence. Among those with 0 to 9 missing teeth, 46% had carotid artery plaque, whereas among those with ≥10 missing teeth, carotid artery plaque prevalence was ≈60% (P<0.05). Conclusions - Our data suggest that tooth loss is a marker of past periodontal disease in this population and is related to subclinical atherosclerosis, thereby providing a potential pathway for a relationship with clinical events.

KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Infection

KW - Periodontal disease

KW - Tooth loss

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0041917631&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0041917631&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/01.STR.0000085086.50957.22

DO - 10.1161/01.STR.0000085086.50957.22

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 2120

EP - 2125

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 9

ER -