Relations between effective emotional self-regulation, attentional control, and low-income preschoolers’ social competence with peers

C. Cybele Raver, Erika K. Blackburn, Mary Bancroft, Nancy Torp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Relations between children’s emotional self-regulation, attentional control, and peer social competence (as reported by both teachers and peers) were examined for 51 low-income, preschool-aged children enrolled in Head Start. Using a short delay-of-gratification task administered at Head Start sites, children’s use of selfdistraction was found to be positively associated with their success in handling the delay, replicating previous, laboratory-based research. Contrary to our expectations, children’s use of self-distraction was found to be unrelated to their attentional control, as assessed during a computer task. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that children’s use of self-distraction predicted significant variance in both peer- and teacher-reports of children’s competence with peers, even after children’s attentional control was statistically taken into account. These findings are discussed in light of current models of reactivity and regulation in predicting young children’s social behavior, as well as in the context of early intervention efforts for children facing socioeconomic risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-350
Number of pages18
JournalEarly Education and Development
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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social competence
Social Behavior
Preschool Children
self-regulation
Mental Competency
low income
Regression Analysis
Research
teacher
social behavior
regulation
regression
Self-Control
Social Skills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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Relations between effective emotional self-regulation, attentional control, and low-income preschoolers’ social competence with peers. / Raver, C. Cybele; Blackburn, Erika K.; Bancroft, Mary; Torp, Nancy.

In: Early Education and Development, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 333-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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