Reframing the context of preventive health care services and prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections for young men: New opportunities to reduce racial/ethnic sexual health disparities

Yzette Lanier, Madeline Y. Sutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Young Black males, aged 13 to 29 years, have the highest annual rates of HIV infections in the United States. Young Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are the only subgroup with significant increases in HIV incident infections in recent years. Black men, particularly MSM, are also disproportionately affected by other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Therefore, we must strengthen HIV and STI prevention opportunities during routine, preventive health care visits and at other, nontraditional venues accessed by young men of color, with inclusive, nonjudgmental approaches. The Affordable Care Act and National HIV/AIDS Strategy present new opportunities to reframe and strengthen sexual health promotion and HIV and STI prevention efforts with young men of color.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-269
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume103
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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Preventive Health Services
Reproductive Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
HIV
HIV Infections
Color
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Health Promotion
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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