Reconstruction of natural scenes from ensemble responses in the lateral geniculate nucleus

Garrett B. Stanley, Fei Li, Yang Dan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A major challenge in studying sensory processing is to understand the meaning of the neural messages encoded in the spiking activity of neurons. From the recorded responses in a sensory circuit, what information can we extract about the outside world? Here we used a linear decoding technique to reconstruct spatiotemporal visual inputs from ensemble responses in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the cat. From the activity of 177 cells, we have reconstructed natural scenes with recognizable moving objects. The quality of reconstruction depends on the number of cells. For each point in space, the quality of reconstruction begins to saturate at six to eight pairs of on and off cells, approaching the estimated coverage factor in the LGN of the cat. Thus, complex visual inputs can be reconstructed with a simple decoding algorithm, and these analyses provide a basis for understanding ensemble coding in the early visual pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8036-8042
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume19
Issue number18
StatePublished - Sep 15 1999

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Geniculate Bodies
Cats
Visual Pathways
Cell Count
Neurons

Keywords

  • Cat
  • Ensemble responses
  • LGN
  • Natural scenes
  • Reconstruction
  • Visual system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Reconstruction of natural scenes from ensemble responses in the lateral geniculate nucleus. / Stanley, Garrett B.; Li, Fei; Dan, Yang.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 19, No. 18, 15.09.1999, p. 8036-8042.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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