Rechargeable lithium-ion cell state of charge and defect detection by in-situ inside-out magnetic resonance imaging /639/638/11/878 /639/638/161/891 /639/638/675 /123 /120 /128 /140/131 article

Andrew J. Ilott, Mohaddese Mohammadi, Christopher M. Schauerman, Matthew J. Ganter, Alexej Jerschow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

When and why does a rechargeable battery lose capacity or go bad? This is a question that is surprisingly difficult to answer; yet, it lies at the heart of progress in the fields of consumer electronics, electric vehicles, and electrical storage. The difficulty is related to the limited amount of information one can obtain from a cell without taking it apart and analyzing it destructively. Here, we demonstrate that the measurement of tiny induced magnetic field changes within a cell can be used to assess the level of lithium incorporation into the electrode materials, and diagnose certain cell flaws that could arise from assembly. The measurements are fast, can be performed on finished and unfinished cells, and most importantly, can be done nondestructively with cells that are compatible with commercial design requirements with conductive enclosures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1776
JournalNature Communications
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Magnetic resonance
Lithium
magnetic resonance
lithium
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Ions
Imaging techniques
Consumer electronics
Secondary batteries
defects
Electric vehicles
cells
Enclosures
ions
Magnetic fields
Defects
Electrodes
Magnetic Fields
electrode materials
enclosure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Rechargeable lithium-ion cell state of charge and defect detection by in-situ inside-out magnetic resonance imaging /639/638/11/878 /639/638/161/891 /639/638/675 /123 /120 /128 /140/131 article. / Ilott, Andrew J.; Mohammadi, Mohaddese; Schauerman, Christopher M.; Ganter, Matthew J.; Jerschow, Alexej.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1776, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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