Re-parameterization reduces irreducible geometric constraint systems

Hichem Barki, Lincong Fang, Dominique Michelucci, Sebti Foufou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

You recklessly told your boss that solving a non-linear system of size n (n unknowns and n equations) requires a time proportional to n, as you were not very attentive during algorithmic complexity lectures. So now, you have only one night to solve a problem of big size (e.g., 1000 equations/unknowns), otherwise you will be fired in the next morning. The system is well-constrained and structurally irreducible: it does not contain any strictly smaller well-constrained subsystems. Its size is big, so the Newton-Raphson method is too slow and impractical. The most frustrating thing is that if you knew the values of a small number k蠐n of key unknowns, then the system would be reducible to small square subsystems and easily solved. You wonder if it would be possible to exploit this reducibility, even without knowing the values of these few key unknowns. This article shows that it is indeed possible. This is done at the lowest level, at the linear algebra routines level, so that numerous solvers (Newton-Raphson, homotopy, and also p-adic methods relying on Hensel lifting) widely involved in geometric constraint solving and CAD applications can benefit from this decomposition with minor modifications. For instance, with k蠐n key unknowns, the cost of a Newton iteration becomes O(kn2) instead of O(n3). Several experiments showing a significant performance gain of our re-parameterization technique are reported in this paper to consolidate our theoretical findings and to motivate its practical usage for bigger systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)182-192
Number of pages11
JournalCAD Computer Aided Design
Volume70
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Linear algebra
Newton-Raphson method
Parameterization
Nonlinear systems
Computer aided design
Decomposition
Costs
Experiments

Keywords

  • Decomposition
  • Geometric constraints solving
  • Geometric modeling with constraints
  • Re-parameterization
  • Reduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Re-parameterization reduces irreducible geometric constraint systems. / Barki, Hichem; Fang, Lincong; Michelucci, Dominique; Foufou, Sebti.

In: CAD Computer Aided Design, Vol. 70, 01.01.2016, p. 182-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barki, Hichem ; Fang, Lincong ; Michelucci, Dominique ; Foufou, Sebti. / Re-parameterization reduces irreducible geometric constraint systems. In: CAD Computer Aided Design. 2016 ; Vol. 70. pp. 182-192.
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