Rationale and design of Faith-based Approaches in the Treatment of Hypertension (FAITH), a lifestyle intervention targeting blood pressure control among black church members

Kristie J. Lancaster, Antoinette M. Schoenthaler, Sara A. Midberry, Sheldon O. Watts, Matthew R. Nulty, Helen V. Cole, Elizabeth Ige, William Chaplin, Gbenga Ogedegbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Uncontrolled hypertension (HTN) is a significant public health problem among blacks in the United States. Despite the proven efficacy of therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC) on blood pressure (BP) reduction in clinical trials, few studies have examined their effectiveness in church-based settings-an influential institution for health promotion in black communities. Methods Using a cluster-randomized, 2-arm trial design, this study evaluates the effectiveness of a faith-based TLC intervention vs health education (HE) control on BP reduction among hypertensive black adults. The intervention is delivered by trained lay health advisors through group TLC sessions plus motivational interviewing in 32 black churches. Participants in the intervention group receive 11 weekly TLC sessions targeting weight loss, increasing physical activity, fruit, vegetable and low-fat dairy intake, and decreasing fat and sodium intake, plus 3 monthly individual motivational interviewing sessions. Participants in the control group attend 11 weekly classes on HTN and other health topics delivered by health care experts. The primary outcome is change in BP from baseline to 6 months. Secondary outcomes include level of physical activity, percent change in weight, and fruit and vegetable consumption at 6 months, and BP control at 9 months. Conclusion If successful, this trial will provide an alternative and culturally appropriate model for HTN control through evidence-based lifestyle modification delivered in churches by lay health advisors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-307
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume167
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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Life Style
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Motivational Interviewing
Vegetables
Fruit
Health
Fats
Exercise
Therapeutics
Health Promotion
Health Education
Weight Loss
Public Health
Sodium
Clinical Trials
Delivery of Health Care
Weights and Measures
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Rationale and design of Faith-based Approaches in the Treatment of Hypertension (FAITH), a lifestyle intervention targeting blood pressure control among black church members. / Lancaster, Kristie J.; Schoenthaler, Antoinette M.; Midberry, Sara A.; Watts, Sheldon O.; Nulty, Matthew R.; Cole, Helen V.; Ige, Elizabeth; Chaplin, William; Ogedegbe, Gbenga.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 167, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 301-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lancaster, Kristie J. ; Schoenthaler, Antoinette M. ; Midberry, Sara A. ; Watts, Sheldon O. ; Nulty, Matthew R. ; Cole, Helen V. ; Ige, Elizabeth ; Chaplin, William ; Ogedegbe, Gbenga. / Rationale and design of Faith-based Approaches in the Treatment of Hypertension (FAITH), a lifestyle intervention targeting blood pressure control among black church members. In: American Heart Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 167, No. 3. pp. 301-307.
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