Rates and predictors of uncontrolled hypertension among hypertensive homeless adults using new york city shelter-based clinics

Ramin Asgary, Blanca Sckell, Analena Alcabes, Ramesh Naderi, Antoinette Schoenthaler, Gbenga Ogedegbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE We undertook a study to determine the rates, predictors, and barriers to blood pressure control among homeless and nonhomeless hypertensive adult patients from 10 New York City shelter-based clinics. METHODS The study was a retrospective chart review of blood pressure measurements, sociodemographic characteristics, and factors associated with homelessness and hypertension extracted from the medical records of a random sample of hypertensive patients (N = 210) in 2014. RESULTS Most patients were African American or Hispanic; 24.8% were female, and 84.3% were homeless for a mean duration of 3.07 years (SD = 5.04 years). Homeless adult patients were younger, had less insurance, and were more likely to be a current smoker and alcohol abuser. Of the 210 hypertensive patients, 40.1% of homeless and 33.3% of nonhomeless patients had uncontrolled blood pressure (P = .29) when compared with US rates for hypertensive adults, which range between 19.6% and 24.8%, respectively; 15.8% of homeless patients had stage 2 hypertension (P = .27). Homeless hypertensive patients with diabetes or multiple chronic diseases had better blood pressure control (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-46
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Family Medicine
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Homeless Persons
Insurance
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Medical Records
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Healthcare disparities
  • Homeless persons
  • Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Rates and predictors of uncontrolled hypertension among hypertensive homeless adults using new york city shelter-based clinics. / Asgary, Ramin; Sckell, Blanca; Alcabes, Analena; Naderi, Ramesh; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Ogedegbe, Gbenga.

In: Annals of Family Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 41-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Asgary, Ramin ; Sckell, Blanca ; Alcabes, Analena ; Naderi, Ramesh ; Schoenthaler, Antoinette ; Ogedegbe, Gbenga. / Rates and predictors of uncontrolled hypertension among hypertensive homeless adults using new york city shelter-based clinics. In: Annals of Family Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 41-46.
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