Rapid social perception is flexible: Approach and avoidance motivational states shape P100 responses to other-race faces

William A. Cunningham, Jay J. Van Bavel, Nathan L. Arbuckle, Dominic J. Packer, Ashley S. Waggoner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research on person categorization suggests that people automatically and inflexibly categorize others according to group memberships, such as race. Consistent with this view, research using electroencephalography (EEG) has found that White participants tend to show an early difference in processing Black versus White faces. Yet, new research has shown that these ostensibly automatic biases may not be as inevitable as once thought and that motivational influences may be able to eliminate these biases. It is unclear, however, whether motivational influences shape the initial biases or whether these biases can only be modulated by later, controlled processes. Using EEG to examine the time course of biased processing, we manipulated approach and avoidance motivational states by having participants pull or push a joystick, respectively, while viewing White or Black faces. Consistent with previous work on own-race bias, we observed a greater P100 response to White than Black faces; however, this racial bias was attenuated in the approach condition. These data suggest that rapid social perception may be flexible and can be modulated by motivational states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number140
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Issue numberMAY 2012
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2012

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Social Perception
Electroencephalography
Research
Racism
hydroquinone

Keywords

  • Approach
  • ERP
  • Face perception
  • Motivation
  • P100
  • Race
  • Social perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Rapid social perception is flexible : Approach and avoidance motivational states shape P100 responses to other-race faces. / Cunningham, William A.; Van Bavel, Jay J.; Arbuckle, Nathan L.; Packer, Dominic J.; Waggoner, Ashley S.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, No. MAY 2012, 140, 24.05.2012, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cunningham, William A. ; Van Bavel, Jay J. ; Arbuckle, Nathan L. ; Packer, Dominic J. ; Waggoner, Ashley S. / Rapid social perception is flexible : Approach and avoidance motivational states shape P100 responses to other-race faces. In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2012 ; No. MAY 2012. pp. 1-7.
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