Rapid and sustained symptom reduction following psilocybin treatment for anxiety and depression in patients with life-threatening cancer

A randomized controlled trial

Stephen Ross, Anthony Bossis, Jeffrey Guss, Gabrielle Agin-Liebes, Tara Malone, Barry Cohen, Sarah E. Mennenga, Alexander Belser, Krystallia Kalliontzi, James Babb, Zhe Su, Patricia Corby, Brian Schmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Clinically significant anxiety and depression are common in patients with cancer, and are associated with poor psychiatric and medical outcomes. Historical and recent research suggests a role for psilocybin to treat cancer-related anxiety and depression. Methods: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial, 29 patients with cancer-related anxiety and depression were randomly assigned and received treatment with single-dose psilocybin (0.3 mg/kg) or niacin, both in conjunction with psychotherapy. The primary outcomes were anxiety and depression assessed between groups prior to the crossover at 7 weeks. Results: Prior to the crossover, psilocybin produced immediate, substantial, and sustained improvements in anxiety and depression and led to decreases in cancer-related demoralization and hopelessness, improved spiritual wellbeing, and increased quality of life. At the 6.5-month follow-up, psilocybin was associated with enduring anxiolytic and anti-depressant effects (approximately 60-80% of participants continued with clinically significant reductions in depression or anxiety), sustained benefits in existential distress and quality of life, as well as improved attitudes towards death. The psilocybin-induced mystical experience mediated the therapeutic effect of psilocybin on anxiety and depression. Conclusions: In conjunction with psychotherapy, single moderate-dose psilocybin produced rapid, robust and enduring anxiolytic and anti-depressant effects in patients with cancer-related psychological distress. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00957359.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1165-1180
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Psychopharmacology
Volume30
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Psilocybin
Anxiety
Randomized Controlled Trials
Depression
Neoplasms
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Psychotherapy
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Niacin
Therapeutic Uses
Double-Blind Method
Cross-Over Studies
Psychiatry
Placebos
Psychology

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • cancer
  • depression
  • mystical experience
  • Psilocybin
  • psychedelic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Rapid and sustained symptom reduction following psilocybin treatment for anxiety and depression in patients with life-threatening cancer : A randomized controlled trial. / Ross, Stephen; Bossis, Anthony; Guss, Jeffrey; Agin-Liebes, Gabrielle; Malone, Tara; Cohen, Barry; Mennenga, Sarah E.; Belser, Alexander; Kalliontzi, Krystallia; Babb, James; Su, Zhe; Corby, Patricia; Schmidt, Brian.

In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, Vol. 30, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 1165-1180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ross, S, Bossis, A, Guss, J, Agin-Liebes, G, Malone, T, Cohen, B, Mennenga, SE, Belser, A, Kalliontzi, K, Babb, J, Su, Z, Corby, P & Schmidt, B 2016, 'Rapid and sustained symptom reduction following psilocybin treatment for anxiety and depression in patients with life-threatening cancer: A randomized controlled trial', Journal of Psychopharmacology, vol. 30, no. 12, pp. 1165-1180. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881116675512
Ross, Stephen ; Bossis, Anthony ; Guss, Jeffrey ; Agin-Liebes, Gabrielle ; Malone, Tara ; Cohen, Barry ; Mennenga, Sarah E. ; Belser, Alexander ; Kalliontzi, Krystallia ; Babb, James ; Su, Zhe ; Corby, Patricia ; Schmidt, Brian. / Rapid and sustained symptom reduction following psilocybin treatment for anxiety and depression in patients with life-threatening cancer : A randomized controlled trial. In: Journal of Psychopharmacology. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 12. pp. 1165-1180.
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