Randomized controlled trial to improve self-efficacy in people with multiple sclerosis: The community reintegration for socially isolated patients (CRISP) program

J. Tamar Kalina, Jim Hinojosa, Lauren Strober, Joshua Bacon, Seamus Donnelly, Yael Goverover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined the efficacy of a 12-wk educational socialization program, Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP), in improving self-efficacy for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We also examined whether participants in the experimental group with increased self-efficacy experienced reduced loneliness and depression. METHOD. This randomized controlled group design included 91 participants with MS (experimental group, n 5 51; control group, n 5 40). Participants were between ages 20 and 68 yr, and the majority experienced a relapsing-remitting MS course (86%) and mild to moderate disability. Participants completed baseline and posttreatment assessments, including questionnaires assessing self-efficacy, loneliness, and depression. RESULTS. Experimental group participants significantly improved in self-efficacy compared with control group participants. Experimental group participants who demonstrated improved self-efficacy reported reduced perceptions of loneliness but not depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION. CRISP is a promising intervention to improve self-efficacy for people with MS. However, results need to be treated with caution given the study's limitations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7205205030
JournalAmerican Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume72
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Self Efficacy
Multiple Sclerosis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Loneliness
Depression
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Control Groups
Socialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Randomized controlled trial to improve self-efficacy in people with multiple sclerosis : The community reintegration for socially isolated patients (CRISP) program. / Tamar Kalina, J.; Hinojosa, Jim; Strober, Lauren; Bacon, Joshua; Donnelly, Seamus; Goverover, Yael.

In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 72, No. 5, 7205205030, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE. We examined the efficacy of a 12-wk educational socialization program, Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP), in improving self-efficacy for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We also examined whether participants in the experimental group with increased self-efficacy experienced reduced loneliness and depression. METHOD. This randomized controlled group design included 91 participants with MS (experimental group, n 5 51; control group, n 5 40). Participants were between ages 20 and 68 yr, and the majority experienced a relapsing-remitting MS course (86{\%}) and mild to moderate disability. Participants completed baseline and posttreatment assessments, including questionnaires assessing self-efficacy, loneliness, and depression. RESULTS. Experimental group participants significantly improved in self-efficacy compared with control group participants. Experimental group participants who demonstrated improved self-efficacy reported reduced perceptions of loneliness but not depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION. CRISP is a promising intervention to improve self-efficacy for people with MS. However, results need to be treated with caution given the study's limitations.",
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