Radical illusion (a game against)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There are two voices in the work of Jean Baudrillard, the early voice, which lasted less than 10 years, and the mature voice, which lasted about 30. The first voice is younger and more conventionally leftist. It was fully embedded in the intellectual debates of the late 1960s. A committed Marxist, the younger Baudrillard wrote on labor and needs, use-value and production. But after this period as a young man, Baudrillard transitioned into a very different thinker in the middle to late 1970s. He developed a whole new theoretical vocabulary that was completely in tune with that decade's historical transformation into digitization, postindustrial economies, immaterial labor, mediation, and simulation. His theories of play and games are at the very heart of this transformation. Through a close reading of several texts, this essay explores Baudrillard's interest in play and games through the concepts of seduction, the fatal strategy, illusion, and what he called the "principle of separation."

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-391
Number of pages16
JournalGames and Culture
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Fingerprint

labor
mediation
vocabulary
Personnel
Game Theory
simulation
economy
Vocabulary
Analog to digital conversion
Values
Reading
Illusion
Jean Baudrillard
Seduction
Digitization
1960s
Simulation
Close Reading
Thinkers
Mediation

Keywords

  • Baudrillard
  • Game
  • Illusion
  • Play
  • Seduction
  • Separative cause

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Communication
  • Anthropology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Radical illusion (a game against). / Galloway, Alexander.

In: Games and Culture, Vol. 2, No. 4, 2007, p. 376-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galloway, Alexander. / Radical illusion (a game against). In: Games and Culture. 2007 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 376-391.
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