Racial and mental illness stereotypes and discrimination: An identity-based analysis of the virginia tech and columbine shootings

Charlene Y. Chen, Valerie Purdie-Vaughns, Jo C. Phelan, Gary Yu, Larry Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Virginia Tech and Columbine High shootings are 2 of the deadliest school massacres in the United States. The present study investigates in a nationally representative sample how White Americans' causal attributions of these shooting moderate their attitudes toward the shooter's race. White Americans shown a vignette based on the Virginia Tech shooting were more likely to espouse negative beliefs about Korean American men and distance themselves from this group the more they believed that the shooter's race caused the shooting. Among those who were shown a vignette based on the Columbine High shooting, believing that mental illness caused the shooting was associated with weaker negative beliefs about White American men. White Americans in a third condition who were given the Virginia Tech vignette and prompted to subtype the shooter according to his race were less likely to possess negative beliefs about Korean American men the more they believed that mental illness caused the shooting. There was no evidence for the ultimate attribution error. Theoretical accounts based on the stereotype and in-group-out-group bias literature are presented. The current findings have important implications for media depictions of minority group behavior and intergroup relations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-287
Number of pages9
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Aquilegia
mental illness
stereotype
discrimination
Asian Americans
attribution
Minority Groups
massacre
Group
outgroup
minority
trend
school
evidence

Keywords

  • Asian Americans
  • Discrimination
  • Exemplar
  • School shootings
  • Stereotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Racial and mental illness stereotypes and discrimination : An identity-based analysis of the virginia tech and columbine shootings. / Chen, Charlene Y.; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Phelan, Jo C.; Yu, Gary; Yang, Larry.

In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 279-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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