Race/ethnicity and patient confidence to self-manage cardiovascular disease

Jan Blustein, Melissa Valentine, Holly Mead, Marsha Regenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Minority populations bear a disproportionate burden of chronic disease, due to higher disease prevalence and greater morbidity and mortality. Recent research has shown that several factors, including confidence to self-manage care, are associated with better health behaviors and outcomes among those with chronic disease. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between minority status and confidence to self-manage cardiovascular disease (CVD). STUDY SAMPLE: Survey respondents admitted to 10 hospitals participating in the "Expecting Success" program, with a diagnosis of CVD, during January-September 2006 (n = 1107). RESULTS: Minority race/ethnicity was substantially associated with lower confidence to self-manage CVD, with 36.5% of Hispanic patients, 30.7% of Black patients, and 16.0% of white patients reporting low confidence (P < 0.001). However, in multivariate analysis controlling for socioeconomic status and clinical severity, minority status was not predictive of low confidence. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is an association between race/ethnicity and confidence to self-manage care, that relationship is explained by the association of race/ethnicity with socioeconomic status and clinical severity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)924-929
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Care
Volume46
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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Cardiovascular Diseases
ethnicity
confidence
Self Care
Disease
Social Class
Chronic Disease
minority
Health Behavior
Hispanic Americans
social status
Multivariate Analysis
Morbidity
Mortality
health behavior
Research
multivariate analysis
morbidity
Population
mortality

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Chronic disease
  • Race
  • Racial disparities
  • Self-care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Race/ethnicity and patient confidence to self-manage cardiovascular disease. / Blustein, Jan; Valentine, Melissa; Mead, Holly; Regenstein, Marsha.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 46, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 924-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blustein, Jan ; Valentine, Melissa ; Mead, Holly ; Regenstein, Marsha. / Race/ethnicity and patient confidence to self-manage cardiovascular disease. In: Medical Care. 2008 ; Vol. 46, No. 9. pp. 924-929.
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