Race and Place: Exploring the Intersection of Inequity and Volunteerism Among Older Black and White Adults

Ernest Gonzales, Huei Wern Shen, Yi Wang, Linda Sprague Martinez, Julie Norstrand

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Although the historical impact of racial segregation and ongoing health and economic inequities between older Black and White adults is well documented, little is known about the relationships among race, individual- and neighborhood-resources, and formal volunteering in later life. This study explores this intersection. Individual-level data from 268 respondents aged 55+ were collected in the St. Louis metropolitan area through paper-based mail surveys. Objective neighborhood data were obtained at the zip code level from secondary sources and matched with respondents. Using exploratory factor analysis, we constructed a 14-item environmental scale with 3 neighborhood dimensions (economic, social, and built environment). Older Black adults had lower levels of education; had fewer financial assets; lived in neighborhoods with less economic resources and lower built environment scores; and fewer formally volunteered when compared to older White adults. Individual resources (financial assets, health) and neighborhood resources (social and built environment) were positively associated with formal volunteering among older Black adults. Only individual resources (age, marital status, financial assets, health) were associated with formal volunteering among older White adults. A coherent set of policies that bolsters individual and environmental capacities may increase the rate of volunteerism among older black adults.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)381-400
    Number of pages20
    JournalJournal of Gerontological Social Work
    Volume59
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 3 2016

    Fingerprint

    volunteerism
    Volunteers
    Social Environment
    Economics
    assets
    resources
    health
    Health Resources
    Health
    Marital Status
    economics
    Postal Service
    mail survey
    Statistical Factor Analysis
    marital status
    level of education
    segregation
    hydroquinone
    factor analysis
    agglomeration area

    Keywords

    • Environmental capacity
    • formal volunteering
    • inclusion
    • inequity
    • neighborhoods
    • productive aging
    • race

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
    • Nursing (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

    Race and Place : Exploring the Intersection of Inequity and Volunteerism Among Older Black and White Adults. / Gonzales, Ernest; Shen, Huei Wern; Wang, Yi; Martinez, Linda Sprague; Norstrand, Julie.

    In: Journal of Gerontological Social Work, Vol. 59, No. 5, 03.07.2016, p. 381-400.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Gonzales, Ernest ; Shen, Huei Wern ; Wang, Yi ; Martinez, Linda Sprague ; Norstrand, Julie. / Race and Place : Exploring the Intersection of Inequity and Volunteerism Among Older Black and White Adults. In: Journal of Gerontological Social Work. 2016 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 381-400.
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