Quantifying Human Experience in Interior Architectural Spaces

A. Radwan, Semiha Ergan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

People spend more than 90% of their time indoors, which makes it crucial to assess the relation between the interior environment and human experience. Architecture, psychology, and neuroscience researchers have been trying to relate different design features to human experience. However, the extent of how we feel and experience in a space has not been fully quantified yet. One of the challenges has been the technical limitations in generating architectural configurations similar to real-world settings. Technologies such as virtual reality and biometric tools provide opportunities for quantification of physiological and emotional conditions of humans as they interact with different architecture spaces. This paper provides an overview of the method and results of the initial experiments. Findings showed that emotional response of people change based on different architectural design features configurations. Findings will help practitioners in the AEC industry to improve the design process for achieving better human experience in spaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationComputing in Civil Engineering 2017
Subtitle of host publicationSensing, Simulation, and Visualization - Selected Papers from the ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering 2017
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages373-380
Number of pages8
Volume2017-June
ISBN (Electronic)9780784480830
StatePublished - 2017
Event2017 ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering, IWCCE 2017 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Jun 25 2017Jun 27 2017

Other

Other2017 ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering, IWCCE 2017
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period6/25/176/27/17

Fingerprint

Architectural design
Biometrics
Virtual reality
Industry
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Radwan, A., & Ergan, S. (2017). Quantifying Human Experience in Interior Architectural Spaces. In Computing in Civil Engineering 2017: Sensing, Simulation, and Visualization - Selected Papers from the ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering 2017 (Vol. 2017-June, pp. 373-380). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

Quantifying Human Experience in Interior Architectural Spaces. / Radwan, A.; Ergan, Semiha.

Computing in Civil Engineering 2017: Sensing, Simulation, and Visualization - Selected Papers from the ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering 2017. Vol. 2017-June American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. p. 373-380.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Radwan, A & Ergan, S 2017, Quantifying Human Experience in Interior Architectural Spaces. in Computing in Civil Engineering 2017: Sensing, Simulation, and Visualization - Selected Papers from the ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering 2017. vol. 2017-June, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 373-380, 2017 ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering, IWCCE 2017, Seattle, United States, 6/25/17.
Radwan A, Ergan S. Quantifying Human Experience in Interior Architectural Spaces. In Computing in Civil Engineering 2017: Sensing, Simulation, and Visualization - Selected Papers from the ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering 2017. Vol. 2017-June. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2017. p. 373-380
Radwan, A. ; Ergan, Semiha. / Quantifying Human Experience in Interior Architectural Spaces. Computing in Civil Engineering 2017: Sensing, Simulation, and Visualization - Selected Papers from the ASCE International Workshop on Computing in Civil Engineering 2017. Vol. 2017-June American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. pp. 373-380
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