Quality of care of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

A report of a performance improvement initiative

Fred R. Hirsch, Robert M. Jotte, Carolyn Berry, William A. Mencia, Stephanie A. Stowell, Allison J. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the molecular characterization of tumors, and the availability of new agents to treat non-small-cell lung cancer has increased. Despite these achievements, optimal care of patients with this condition remains less than ideal. Although national quality measures and guideline recommendations provide the necessary framework for patient care, routine self-assessment of adherence to these measures is required for physician practice improvement. To this end, a performance improvement initiative that met national continuing medical education standards was designed. Methods: Focusing on non-small-cell lung cancer patient care, oncologists underwent a three-step process that included a self-assessment of predetermined performance measures, the development and implementation of an actionable plan for improvement, and a second round of assessment to measure practice change. Results: A total of 440 unique patient charts were reviewed by 22 practicing oncologists. Participants demonstrated high baseline performance levels of established quality measures, such as inclusion of the patient's pathology report and assessment of smoking history. Significant gains were observed in the areas of supportive care, including assessment of the patient's emotional well-being and the use of molecular markers in diagnostic and treatment decision making. Conclusions: Data from this study support the value of performance improvement initiatives to help increase physician delivery of evidence-based care to patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-97
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Control
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Quality of Health Care
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Patient Care
Physicians
Continuing Medical Education
Cause of Death
Lung Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Decision Making
Smoking
History
Guidelines
Pathology
Self-Assessment
Oncologists
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Hirsch, F. R., Jotte, R. M., Berry, C., Mencia, W. A., Stowell, S. A., & Gardner, A. J. (2014). Quality of care of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: A report of a performance improvement initiative. Cancer Control, 21(1), 90-97.

Quality of care of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer : A report of a performance improvement initiative. / Hirsch, Fred R.; Jotte, Robert M.; Berry, Carolyn; Mencia, William A.; Stowell, Stephanie A.; Gardner, Allison J.

In: Cancer Control, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 90-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirsch, FR, Jotte, RM, Berry, C, Mencia, WA, Stowell, SA & Gardner, AJ 2014, 'Quality of care of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: A report of a performance improvement initiative', Cancer Control, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 90-97.
Hirsch, Fred R. ; Jotte, Robert M. ; Berry, Carolyn ; Mencia, William A. ; Stowell, Stephanie A. ; Gardner, Allison J. / Quality of care of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer : A report of a performance improvement initiative. In: Cancer Control. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 90-97.
@article{65cb2f7f7e26449488781aee38cd6953,
title = "Quality of care of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: A report of a performance improvement initiative",
abstract = "Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the molecular characterization of tumors, and the availability of new agents to treat non-small-cell lung cancer has increased. Despite these achievements, optimal care of patients with this condition remains less than ideal. Although national quality measures and guideline recommendations provide the necessary framework for patient care, routine self-assessment of adherence to these measures is required for physician practice improvement. To this end, a performance improvement initiative that met national continuing medical education standards was designed. Methods: Focusing on non-small-cell lung cancer patient care, oncologists underwent a three-step process that included a self-assessment of predetermined performance measures, the development and implementation of an actionable plan for improvement, and a second round of assessment to measure practice change. Results: A total of 440 unique patient charts were reviewed by 22 practicing oncologists. Participants demonstrated high baseline performance levels of established quality measures, such as inclusion of the patient's pathology report and assessment of smoking history. Significant gains were observed in the areas of supportive care, including assessment of the patient's emotional well-being and the use of molecular markers in diagnostic and treatment decision making. Conclusions: Data from this study support the value of performance improvement initiatives to help increase physician delivery of evidence-based care to patients.",
author = "Hirsch, {Fred R.} and Jotte, {Robert M.} and Carolyn Berry and Mencia, {William A.} and Stowell, {Stephanie A.} and Gardner, {Allison J.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "90--97",
journal = "Cancer Control",
issn = "1073-2748",
publisher = "H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of care of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

T2 - A report of a performance improvement initiative

AU - Hirsch, Fred R.

AU - Jotte, Robert M.

AU - Berry, Carolyn

AU - Mencia, William A.

AU - Stowell, Stephanie A.

AU - Gardner, Allison J.

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the molecular characterization of tumors, and the availability of new agents to treat non-small-cell lung cancer has increased. Despite these achievements, optimal care of patients with this condition remains less than ideal. Although national quality measures and guideline recommendations provide the necessary framework for patient care, routine self-assessment of adherence to these measures is required for physician practice improvement. To this end, a performance improvement initiative that met national continuing medical education standards was designed. Methods: Focusing on non-small-cell lung cancer patient care, oncologists underwent a three-step process that included a self-assessment of predetermined performance measures, the development and implementation of an actionable plan for improvement, and a second round of assessment to measure practice change. Results: A total of 440 unique patient charts were reviewed by 22 practicing oncologists. Participants demonstrated high baseline performance levels of established quality measures, such as inclusion of the patient's pathology report and assessment of smoking history. Significant gains were observed in the areas of supportive care, including assessment of the patient's emotional well-being and the use of molecular markers in diagnostic and treatment decision making. Conclusions: Data from this study support the value of performance improvement initiatives to help increase physician delivery of evidence-based care to patients.

AB - Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the molecular characterization of tumors, and the availability of new agents to treat non-small-cell lung cancer has increased. Despite these achievements, optimal care of patients with this condition remains less than ideal. Although national quality measures and guideline recommendations provide the necessary framework for patient care, routine self-assessment of adherence to these measures is required for physician practice improvement. To this end, a performance improvement initiative that met national continuing medical education standards was designed. Methods: Focusing on non-small-cell lung cancer patient care, oncologists underwent a three-step process that included a self-assessment of predetermined performance measures, the development and implementation of an actionable plan for improvement, and a second round of assessment to measure practice change. Results: A total of 440 unique patient charts were reviewed by 22 practicing oncologists. Participants demonstrated high baseline performance levels of established quality measures, such as inclusion of the patient's pathology report and assessment of smoking history. Significant gains were observed in the areas of supportive care, including assessment of the patient's emotional well-being and the use of molecular markers in diagnostic and treatment decision making. Conclusions: Data from this study support the value of performance improvement initiatives to help increase physician delivery of evidence-based care to patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84890916811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84890916811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 90

EP - 97

JO - Cancer Control

JF - Cancer Control

SN - 1073-2748

IS - 1

ER -