Public policies, women's employment after childbearing, and child well-being

Elizabeth Washbrook, Christopher J. Ruhm, Jane Waldfogel, Wen-Jui Han

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    In this paper, we consider three U.S. public policies that potentially influence the work decisions of mothers of infants - parental leave laws, exemptions from welfare work requirements, and child care subsidies for low-income families. We estimate the effects of these policies on the timing of work participation after birth, and on a range of outcomes in the subsequent four years, using a group difference-in-difference technique suitable for analysis of cross-sectional data. We find that the three policies affect early maternal work participation, but obtain no evidence of significant consequences for child well-being.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number43
    JournalB.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

    Fingerprint

    Childbearing
    Women's employment
    Child well-being
    Public policy
    Participation
    Low-income families
    Cross-sectional data
    Parental leave
    Difference-in-differences
    Child care subsidies
    Exemption

    Keywords

    • child care subsidies
    • child outcomes
    • parental leave

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Economics and Econometrics
    • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

    Public policies, women's employment after childbearing, and child well-being. / Washbrook, Elizabeth; Ruhm, Christopher J.; Waldfogel, Jane; Han, Wen-Jui.

    In: B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy, Vol. 11, No. 1, 43, 01.01.2011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Washbrook, Elizabeth ; Ruhm, Christopher J. ; Waldfogel, Jane ; Han, Wen-Jui. / Public policies, women's employment after childbearing, and child well-being. In: B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 1.
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